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Conclusions 



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Dill Webb 

John Newman 

Susan Anderson 

Sherri Fries, Dill Dorni 

Dill Dornisch, Sherri r 

Dill Webb 

Susan Anderson, Sherri Fries, Dill Webb 

Susan Anderson, Sherri Fries, Randy 

Gragg, Mike Hanzek, Nancy Herrmann, 

Harold Hilderbran, Richard Hill, 

Suzy Hollerbach, Tracy McKuen, Ruth 

Mills, John Newman, Dill Webb, Randy Webb 



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Artemisia 1981 

The Yearbook of the University of Nevada-Reno 

Reno, Nevada, 89507 

Volume 78 

Copyright 1981 by William Edward Webb. All rights reserved. 

No portion of this book may be reproduced or transmitted by any means without the written permission of 

the editor. 

Printed in Visalia, California by the Jostens American Publishing Company. Library of Congress Catalog 

Number CA26-275. 

All Rights Reserved. 



US. 

■ 



Table Of Contents 



Page 3 



Conclusions 



Page 81 Sports V Things 



Page 145 Living Situations 



Page 197 Faces We've Known 



Page 257 Gangs 



Page 303 Going Home Now 




Conclusions 

Drive east from Sacramento on Interstate 80 over the Donner Pass, go by Donner Lake past Truckee, 
but don't blink through Farad, continue through Verdi and descen into the Truckee Meadows, with a 
view of Peavine Mountain to your left and Mount Rose on your right. 

If you arrive at night, you can see the lights of Reno and Sparks as you pass Boomtown. Should you 
arrive during the day and are lucky enough to have a strong wind to blow the smog away, you can see 
the Shy Clown, nearly eight miles away. 

Before I moved here my grandfather warned me that Reno was so close to hell you could see sparks. 
Well, I haven't met the Devil yet, but I'm sure that when he does visit Reno, he probably stays in that 
monument to decadence that stands between Mill and Glendale. Know what I mean? 

If you want a different view you can drive west from Salt Lake on Interstate 80, north from Carson City 
on U.S. Highway 395, south from Heaven-knows-where on 395 North, east from Lake Tahoe on Highway 
27, or, if you really feel the automobile is to blame for half of the evils in the world, you can fly into 
Cannon International Airport on any of the major airlines. (Try to forget that a good portion of the ticket 
price is still helping to subsidize a group of people who were probably walking or riding a camel before 

you were born.) 

Once you get to Reno find Virginia Street. Just pray we don't have an earthquake while you are on 
Virginia. In one of God's more playful moments she placed a major fault right down the middle of Reno's 

main street. 

So, you may want to hurry and get up to the north end of Virginia Street as fast as possible, especially if 
you are the kind of person that drops mirrors or was born on February 13th. Perched on the north end of 
Virginia Street stands Nevada's oldest and largest university; the University of Nevada-Reno. 

The upcoming stories are about a year at this university. All of these episodes are true ... OK ... at 
least most of them are true. Some are funny, some are sad, some are outrageous, some may make you 
angry, and some are sure to strike a familiar note for you. 












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Beginnings 



I wish I could tell you this university is o 
typical place ... a real college-type place 
with a definitive atmosphere like the bleed- 
ing hearts of Berkeley; the Marie Osmond 
wholesomeness of Brigham Young; the Mer- 
cedes and Chateaubriand Club of Stanford; 
the Chain Link Fence Gang of the University 
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; or the bikini 
and bun crowd of Southern Florida. Unfortunately, the atmosphere here is a little cloudy. 

Trying to identify a mood here is as difficult as figuring out the logic behind the next fiasco the Reno City 
Council will approve. Most Renoites figure that someday one of the casinos will decide to build a dome over 
the entire valley, and the council will have to build a pipeline from the Pacific Ocean to provide water for the 
project. Such things as housing for the workers, environmental concerns and fire codes can be handled later or 
overlooked in one way or another with the proper application of Nevada politics. 

But don't think this is a bad place just because there isn't a college atmosphere or a definitive mood. Reno is 
a 24-hour town and believe me, you can have fun seven days a week. It's one of the only places where 
students can drink for free, thanks to casino drink tokens any time of the day or night. It's one of the few places 
a student can find work for whatever hours he desires, and it's one of the few places that students can become 
independently wealthy from dealing cards. 

Some of the best skiing around is from 30 minutes to no longer than an hour and a half drive away and San 
Francisco is just a four hour drive for those who desire more metropolitan offerings. There are also very few 
places where students can see Willie Nelson, Cher, Kenny Rogers, Red Skelton, Linda Carter and other top- 
billed entertainers for the price of a dinner or drinks. 

There are bad points. If you don't look 21 or have a fake I.D. you may find yourself with nothing to do but 
look at the carp in Manzanita Lake. 

Twenty-one is the legal drinking age in Nevada and although you can obtain the services of a legal 
prostitute at a much earlier age, you can't be around alcohol. Since everything in Reno has slot machines and 
a bar this poses a problem. It's ironic that a state thats whole economic system centers on gambling could 
have such a law. 



The lost year 

Anticipation of my senior year finds 
me more despondent than I would hove 
thought. I've finished the core require- 
ments and om filling in the gaps with 
such nasty little items as English 102, 
Nevada Constitution and microecono- 
mics that remain between myself and 
my diploma. 

It's absurd that a university, which 
should be a bastion of intellectual free- 
dom and education, presents students 
with so much coercion and a system 
which can't be bucked. But who am I to 
question the wisdom of my elders. They, 
who are fat while I am slender, divorced 
while I am in love, in debt when I am 
not, and have fine positions in the uni- 
versity from which they send me out to 
do battle with the world. 

Then there's Mike who has a M.A. in 
philosophy and deals craps downtown. 

"It's a matter of economics,'' he said. 
"Either I deal craps or starve." Amazing 
how six years of college prepares one to 
make such decisions. Mike would have 
probably starved had he not crapped- 
out after his junior year. 

But perhaps this year won't be so 
bad. Perhaps there will be a war. 





** 



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Moving in 



Moving in is always painful. There are those per- 
sons to deal with known as landlords. They are 
always making ridiculous jokes about "all the girls 
running in and out of" my apartment, and ask silly 
questions like, "Are you sure there isn't a cat in your 
apartment?", or, "Why are you running your air 

conditioner in December?" 
Then came Jack. 
My new landlord, Jack, served with the 82nd 

Airborne in the "big one". Other than that his life 

has been basically worthless. I know he's the type 

who will pester me if my Christmas tree is still on the 

balcony in April. 

My apartment is nice, though barren, so I'm put- 
ting up some Donna Summer's posters and a framed 
copy of the orders of the day for the "Night of the 
Longknives" signed by Heinrich Himmler. It's begin- 
ning to feel like home. 

I wandered over to Lincoln Hall after I was settled. 

As I looked up old friends and gave them a hand 

moving in I became acutely aware of the diabolical 

plot devised for dorm dwellers. No matter what 

type of person you are, the dorm office will see to it 

that your are quartered with your exact opposite in 

lifestyle and temperance. That would be OK if the 

old axiom of opposites attracting were true. But it is 

not so - they repel. 

There is little one can do if he has a roommate he 

detests other than put up with him, or then again, 

you could always rub him out. 



Registration 

Registration is always fun. Where else 
can you be pushed, prodded, insulted, 
closed out, cancelled and drop $400 in 
one day? I'm not sure registration con- 
tains any real moral value at all. 

"Do you have the teacher's approval 
to take this creative writing in poetry?" 
the lady at the English department table 
asks. 
"No." 

So I made the trek To Frandsen Hu- 
manities for the professor's approval. 
The professor seemed amiable enough, 
and thank God there was absolutely 
nothing in his office written by Rod 
McKuen. 

He asked to see some of my work, so I 
showed him some poems by William 
Blake which I had typed onto ordinary 
typing paper. "The poems are fair," he 
said, "but they need much more work. 
But what the hell, the class can always 
fit one more." 

To complete my electives I signed up 
for a philosophy seminar entitled "Dis- 
cussions in Cosmic Oddities" or "DISCO - 
a study in punk existentialism." 




10 




A Side Trip 

"We've got to leave this dull 
place," Eddie exclaimed. "I need a 
vacation to recover from the battle 
of registration. 

Eddie didn't have to convince me 
to take a break from school so we 
packed our bags, jumped in the car, 
and drove down to the California 
coast for the weekend. 

The coast is always nice to visit. 
In an afternoon one can drive down 
and by evening be sitting on the 
shore, listening to the waves break. 
The next morning we decided to 
take a walk along the beach. 

"Look," Eddie cried, with an evil 
expression on his face. "There's my 
psychology prof from last spring. 
The big sea lion on that rock sun- 
ning himself. Why, he even barks 
like he did in class." 

"Oh, come on Eddie. That's not 
very nice," I said. "Your professor 
was probably a very nice person 
and doesn't look like that." 

"You're right," Eddie confessed. 
"The sea lion's much taller." 



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Robin Hood returns 




We drove through Tahoe on the way back 
from our short, but rejuvenating vacation. 

"My God," Eddie exclaimed, "Look at it." There 
to our right was the twisted, wrenched and gutted 
remains of Harvey's Casino, opres le bomb. 

"It's finally begun. The revolution has finally 
begun. My God, it's beautiful." 

"What? What are you talking about Eddie?" 
"Harvey's. Can't you see, it's the work of a 
modern day Robin Hood. For years the casinos have robbed and preyed on people's weaknesses with odds 
incredibly in the club's favor. 
"We've never had a chance. Finally somebody has struck back. God I'm proud of them, I wish I were with 

them." 

"Hmmmm," I said. "I share your admiration for the professionalism of the deed, however, I'm suspicious of 

the motives." 

Evenings in Tahoe are not what one may suspect. The few bars which service the area are more of an 
anachronistic psuedo-60's-liberal-holdout-hangouts rather than places where one can truly enjoy himself, 
unless great quantities of liquor are consumed. 

But, if one gets away from the casinos and hangouts, the Lake Tahoe area can be a beautiful place. The 
crystal clear lake, located high in the Sierra Mountains, has some of the most beautiful beaches of any lakes in 
the nation. The water is so clear that you can see your feet turn blue from its icyness when you're standing in 
it. 

During the summer the air carries the fragrance of the pine trees which cover the surrounding mountains, 
and the suntan lotion of the "bathing beauties" which cover the surrounding shores. 

In the winter the snow-covered peaks reflect beautifully upon the water. 



13 



91 



Classes 



Classes begin like any other opening day. Fifteen minutes in, collect o syllabus, be told the text you spent 
$19.95 for is not the correct edition, back to the bookstore to find that the new edition won't arrive till 
November, and back down to the snack bar for a cup of rancid coffee and bantering with old school chums. 

The first week of classes is making me acutely aware of just how tough and uninspiring this year is going to 
be. For the past few years I have taken those classes required of my major, which I thought most interesting. 
The remaining classes would make me, at best, a better conversationalist. Perhaps there is merit in that, but 
not enough to warrant a year of time, energy and inconvenience. Besides, I would be free from the obligation 
of garbage classes and could take classes with real weight and validity. I could become a brilliant conversa- 
tionalist. Anyway . . . 

September is punctuated by the beginning of the football season. I always find it most curious that the 
thousands of supposedly rational semi-educated Americans would pay to watch such a spectacle. No one 
comes from the bleachers any better or any worse, any more or any less of what they were before they 
entered the arena. 

It does not fit the standard required of good literature. A purist would call it an invalid activity, misguided 
sexual energy. Others would argue that it was an activity worthy of its exorbitant budget. Perhaps they're 
right. Laverne and Shirley is the most popular television show of the '81 season. 







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A Night On The Town 



Sex and drugs and rock n' roll. It's on interesting concept. It 
seems, offer four years ot on American university that's about oil 
most students gain any proficiency in. Hopefully I'm wrong. 

Many Wolf Packers enjoy what has come to be colled "Scorpi- 
on Night.'' A Scorpion is a large, inexpensive, extremely potent 
Polynesian delight made of rum and exotic juices. 

Perhaps the best atmosphere for "Scorpion Night" is Trader 
Dick's Lounge at John Ascuoga's Nugget. It's a stimulating atmo- 
sphere for forgetting classes, flunkings and registering for the 
draft. Three or four Scorpions ond the world seems right. A fifth 
Scorpion ond my boxer friend, Dill, ond I decided to enlist in the 
French Foreign Legion (on the delayed entry program, of 
course). We signed the oath in blood on a napkin ond then 
looked for someone to fly us to Iron to rescue the hostages 
before the November 4th anniversary. 

We couldn't find anyone to fly us to Tehran, so we went to 
Dahamo Mamas. All roods lead to Bahama Mamas at 3 a.m., a 
fine female jade fold us over drinks at the bar. 
Dill seemed to like the girl's style, or of least her high slitted dress. So he revealed his innermost secret 
to her. 

"No, I really am," I overheard him say. "I'm o reincarnated Teutonic knight. That's why I'm majoring in 
German and on the boxing team. Germanic philosophy ond fighting,- that's what I live for," Dill said. 
"Really?" The girl was amused. 

"Yes. It is my destiny to find the holy grail; a knight errant in seorch of cosmic truth, or of least a way to 
make o cool 50 grand a year. 

The jade was hearing something new ond was impressed. Dill decided to take the girl home to show- 
off his genuine Crusader sword, mode in Spain. I decided to toke a taxi. 



19 







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Who needs comedians when we have politicians 
and such a vocal first family? 

"I had a discussion with my daughter. Amy, the 
other day before I came here to ask her what the most 
important issue was. She said she thought the issue 
| was control of nuclear weapons." 

— Jimmy Carter in the Carter-Reagan debates. Who 



could argue with the logic of a 12-year-old? 

3 3 1 



"You c 



ou can't pick your kinfolk." — Billy Carter. 



"Sometimes when I look at all my children, I say to myself, Lillian, you should have stayed a virgin." — Lil- 
lian Carter. 

"I'm gonna tell you something real simple and short. Money talks in this business, and bullshit walks." — 
Congressman Michael "Ozzie" Myers, to an undercover FBI agent during the Abscam investigation. And this 
year, election year, is full of it — politics, of course. The most common political platform is probably one of the 
oldest — mudslinging. None of the candidates want to stand on his or her merit. Prime examples are the 
debates between presidential contenders. The information one comes away with is Jimmy Carters' family is 
fine and still articulate; Ronald Reagan is too old and likes to tell ethnic jokes; and John Anderson can't win the 
elections because he is an Independent. 

The same politicing is even found in Nevada. In the senatorial race one candidate has missed too many roll- 
call votes because he's been involved with helping one of the presidential candidates (finally, people may 
know where Nevada is and that we have real cities now and not settlements and forts), and the other 
candidate is, my God, a female. 

The so-called "leaders" are doing nothing but alienate those who think, and becoming a disgraceful 
example for the youth. But, perhaps such is life in politics, though it seems to be getting worse. Et tu Brute. 

The other side of politics is Iraq's invasion of Iran, which proves the so-called emerging nations of the "third 
world" are doing all they can to submerge themselves and remain in third place. America, afterall, is still No. 



As writer Tom Wolfe said, "There is no threat from the 'third world.' They only have exactly what power we 
give them, and the emerging nations' are quickly destroying themselves through war, and economic and 
technical incompetence." 



Iraq is hoping to gain an easy victory 
over on Iron which is suffering from po- 
litical and social chaos. However, Iran is 
rallying to the challenge, and holding 
the Iraqis to a standstill. Doth countries 
are showing little stomach for fighting 
and the "war" is degenerating into who 
can blow up all of whose oil fields first. 
Both sides claim huge and proud victo- 
ries for blowing up the unprotected oil 
fields, which, I suppose, is quite an ac- 
complishment considering a misthrown 
cigarette butt would do the job. 

But, autumn is finding most everyone 
in a cheerful mood, despite all the confu- 
sion and unrest caused by our "leaders." 

Autumn on the campus is particularly 
beautiful. The sagebrush of the sur- 
rounding mountains changes from pale 
green to pale yellow and the skies dark- 
en to a more regal shade of blue. The 
ivy of the older buildings suddenly 
changes to cranberry, and the tall trees 
lining the quad to gold and rust. The 
weather turns comfortably cool, just 
enough for a sweater, but not enough 
for a jacket. 

And mid terms strike a nerve for the 
students who don't fare well and is the 
first hint that they may soon be joining 
the ranks of flunkies and dropouts. 




22 




23 




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Football And Refreshments 

At every football game the stadium is filled with all sorts, but very few of the kind interested in watching 
the game. Most of the humans behind the beer mugs are underage and quite proud of themselves for being 
able to drink enough beer to make themselves sick and destroy a few billion sorely needed brain cells. Alas, 
some things will never change; many a great philosopher and poet were alcoholics in their student days at 
Heidelberg. 

Most of the old drinking cronies are back at "The Wal" again this year. "Pop" Pete Sahner, so called 
because he is 34 years old and still working on his Associate of Arts degree in physical education. And of 
course there is William Bruce Sprinkle Jr. "I'm a blackbelt," he tells the folks gathered around the bar, "a 
Green Beret, airborne and Ranger qualified. I'm a recon marine and have 432 confirmed kills in Nam.'' Mike 
works on the side as an embalmist at a local mortuary. "I enjoy my work," he boasts, and I don't doubt him. 




25 




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'Space Invaders' 

If one becomes bored with classes one can always 
go to the Shy Clown and play "Space Invaders" or 
"Asteroid.'' 

"Space Invaders," my friend Eddie exclaimed. "Go- 
ing to a night club and playing "Space Invaders" — 
and why are you putting "Space Invaders" in quota- 
tion marks? It doesn't deserve them, especially when I 
talk about them. Look! Look! You did it again you 
incompetent pediseguus. Anyway it's like taking a 

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man brothel and only admiring the Donner Summer posters. It's like. 

"Edward, you've made your point. And I must say, in essence I agree. I'm constantly surprised that 
"Space Invaders' doesn't provoke more murders." 

"Look. There's one of those guys" Eddie said, excitedly pointing at a guy on the dance floor. 

"One of what guys," I asked? 

"An Urban cowboy. See! Look at the Calvin Klein cowboy wear. The sequined vest, the studded 
rawhide jacket, the fashion jeans, maroon suede boots and a Stetson hat. They're a strange breed, and 
becoming more and more common each day. 

"Well, they say aliens have actually landed on earth and are walking the streets. Perhaps they're the 
real "Space Invaders," I said. 

"Yes, yes, that's it," Eddie said. He was pure energy now. "They've brought their games with them 
and planted them in the saloons to systematically brainwash us. I knew it! I knew reasonably intelligent 
human beings wouldn't spend good money on such a crude activity - especially when there's so many 
goodlooking women runnin' around." Eddie seemed quite convinced. 



29 



The Lesson 

I sometimes wonder where people come from. It 
is one thing to be annoyed with taking classes that 
one has no interest in, but are necessary to com- 
plete for the core requirement. It is another to gripe 
about a class one took voluntarily. 

"Why don't you drop the class and desist with 
your complaining,'' I asked the complaining young 
lady. 

"I can't,'' she said. "I don't like to quit things.'' 

Well I don't find this quality admirable since I 
have always considered masochism a pathology. 

"Kwitcherbitchin," a few classmates chimed to 
the girl. 

It came to a head a week later. 

"Professor Langenschwanz," she began, "I just 
can't find any reason why we should spend a whole 
class period tracing the philological origins of the 
name Attila just to find out that it means little father. 
It seems like a waste.'' 

Dy now the prof had had enough of these upstarts 
for he pulled no punches in silencing her. 

"Young lady,'' the professor said "You'd be sur- 
prised how often these little bits of trivia have got- 
ten me laid at cocktail parties." 

She shutup. 



to 





Fashions 

Designer jeans are running all over 
the campus this year, on their respective 
bodies, of course. 

The names of Calvin Klein, Gloria 
Vanderbilt, Vidal Sasoon, Gorgio Ar- 
mani, Zena and Jordache are known to 
more of the American populus than the 
name of the vice president. 

Even the "stars" are sewing their 
names on the business. There are Willie 
Nelson jeans, Cheryl Tiegs jeans, and 
even J.R. jeans. 

And the prices! Most begin at $40, but 
what's money when you can wear 
someone's name on your derriere. 

Preppy outfits are also on the come- 
back. Blazers, plaid skirts, argyle socks 
and loafers are roaming the halls of the 
ivy-covered buildings. It seems that it 
wasn't that long ago when everyone 
was rebelling wearing such clothing. 

But, there are the "new wave'' styles 
for those who want to be different. Belts 
are worn everywhere, except around 
the waste, and such little items as safety 
pins and paper clips, things one would 
usually find in a desk, now double for 
earrings and fashion accessories. 



31 




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Homecoming 

"Kids sure ain't like they were in my 
day," was the war cry of many of the 
senior citizens (alumni) when rain emp- 
tied the bleachers at this year's Home- 
coming game. But perhaps it was just as 
well the fair-weather friends went 
home. The Wolf Pack went down in a 
cold and muddy defeat to Cal-State Ful- 

lerton. 

However, the bon fire was lotsa fun 

and well attended. 

The Homecoming parade was a great 

success, with larger-than-ever crowds 

turning out to follow the floats from Mill 

Street to Mackay Stadium. 

Cathy Clements of Kappa Alpha The- 

ta was crowned 1980 Homecoming 
queen and Todd Torvenen of Sigma Al- 
pha Epsilon was declared the "Ugliest 
Man on Campus." Calvin Klein was also 
nominated for the position as this year's 
queen, but was declared ineligible as 

he was not a registered student at UNR. 
In overall competition Sigma Nu and 

their partner sorority, Delta Delta Delta, 

took first place honors. 

Wolves Frolic was as entertaining as 

ever, but was marred by the failure of 

John and Yoko Lennon to show. 



35 



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Ion Smith 

An ASUN Senate decision to invite Ian Smith, 
former prime minister of Rhodesia, proved to ig- 
nite some unrest on the usually politically apa- 
thetic Nevada-Reno campus. Black students — 
mostly African and Iranian students, formerly from 
Iran, met Smith outside Pine Auditorium with jeers 
of "facist" and "racist." Later that night, a speech 
by Smith in the old gym, met with the same 
heckling. 

Smith said he came to make the critical political 
and geographical position of Zimbabwe, (Rhode- 
sia), and how important it is for the United States to support his country, better known. 

But the crowd's mood settled on the theme of racial injustice. That was all they could see in Mr. Ian Smith. 
One student said, "Smith could have stood on his head tonight and for that this crowd would have accused 
him of being racist." 
Smith also sported a new wave-punk cut. 

"It's simple to figure out," Walter Cronkite said to the incredulous staff of political reporters, "Americans 
have assessed the last four years of the Carter administration and have decided they want a change." 
So Ronald Reagan won a smashing victory in the 1980 presidential election. 
"He's a right-wing facist," Sen. Neil of Nevada said. 

"He's the most profoundly ignorant man to be elected to the presidency," consumer advocate Ralph Nader 
said "A corporate puppet." 

Whatever he was called he is now the president of the United States. How Reagan will deal with such 
issues as the 52 American Hostages in Iran, inflation, unemployment, recession, Russia's invasion of Afghani- 
stan, political unrest in Poland and the after effects of Mt. Saint Helens' eruptions will be told in the next four 
years. 



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39 



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The Week That Was 

What damnable karmic influences bore down on 



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Will! 



the state of Nevada one week in November may 
never be known. But at the week's end the total 
damage was enough to last a generation. 

On Friday, Nov. 21, faulty wiring in the MGM Grand 
Hotel-Casino in Las Vegas left 83 dead, countless in- 
jured, and 4,500 people out of work in the money - 
crucial Christmas season. It was the second biggest fire 
tragedy in America. 

On Sunday, Nov. 23, fire spread to northern Nevada 
and found its way into Harrah's-Reno. A grease fire, 
which started in one of Harrah's restaurants, was luckily and quickly extinguished, but not before it worked its 
way into the hotel-casino ventilation system and forced all entertainment to be cancelled, complete 
evacuation of the club, and halted gaming for several hours. 

A few days later, fire struck again, this time in Sparks, completely destroying a small shopping center. 
Again, many businesses and employees were forced out of work at an unfortunate time of the year. 

The icing on the week's freak and tragic events was the attack on Virginia Street pedestrians by a 
"deranged" woman. Maniac Priscilla Ford claimed to have heard a voice telling her to run over as many 
people as she could. Her slaughter left six dead and 24 injured. 

Perhaps every student who has ever wandered down busy Virginia Street should silently say in gratitude, 
"There, but for the grace of God, go I. 



41 



The Hawk' 

Although the Pack lost 40 percent 
of its endeavors this year, it was still 
good enough for a second place 
berth in the Dig Sky Conference. Of 
course, we would have had to 
have done really bad to finish third, 
but not even the Pack could pull 

that off this year. 

However, Frank "The Hawk" 

Hawkins gave Nevadans some- 
thing successful to identify with. 
Hawkins was nominated for the 
Heissman Trophy, he became the 
NCAA No. 3 all-time leading rusher 
with 5,333 yards, and he captured 
his second NCAA Division l-AA rush- 
ing title. 

The senior criminal justice major 
moved in front of fourth place Ar- 
chie Griffin, by the half who gained 

5,177 yards in his college football 
career, and in the fourth quarter 
Hawkins captured third place from 
Howard Stevens, who gained 5,297 

yards. 

"He's the greatest football player 

to play at the University of Ne- 
vada," head football coach Chris 
Ault said. "He's an All-American's 

All American." 




42 




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John Lennon 

The most tragic event of the year was on the eve of 
December 8th, when music genius, John Lennon, was 
murdered in New York. That night, as Lennon returned 
home from o recording session, he was informed that his 
newest — last album, had just turned gold, and on its 
way to platinium. Lennon was quite happy with that, 
being that the album, "Double Fantasy," was his first 
attempt in five years, and it had only been in the record 
shops less than two weeks. For Lennon, who believed in 
the laws of Karma and reincarnation, the words from his 
last single hit, "Starting Over," are most appropriate. 

Lennon raised a cry for peace in an era that desperate- 
ly needed it. The youth of America listened, and for the 
first time in history, a nation's children refused to wage a 
war its elders had started. 

The voice of the entity known in this lifetime as John 
Lennon will be needed again very soon. A new genera- 
tion, with problems beyond our comprehension will heed 
his wisdom. If minstrel Lennon were to be reborn today, 
he would be in his early 20's just after the turn of the 
century. Who knows what kind of world he will behold 
and how the children will hunger. 

Recognizing the return of friend Lennon is up to you. 
Be listening for a voice crying in the wilderness, it will be 
back soon. Perhaps it is best to heed the chorus of the 
latest hit single Lennon recorded, "And when we meet 
again it will be like starting over." 



45 



Fall Finals 

For most students it's a diet of caffeine 
and honey buns. If you hove been dili- 
gent, and hove kept up - two hours of 
study for each hour spent in the class- 
room, then perhaps you will escape 
those hours of study until dawn and try- 
ing to find an empty seat in the library. 

By the end of finals most students are 
absolutely ready for a break, and a 
well-deserved one it is. 

"No, my GPA doesn't really matter to 
me," I overheard a student telling his 
friend in the snack bar. "You see, the 
students who get a 2.0 average effort- 
lessly should be watched much more 
closely than those who wrack their 
brains for their 3.8 or whatever." The 
anonymous student was quite certain of 
what he was saying. 

"History is full of famous people who 
nearly flunked out or were expelled 
from school. Of course there was Ein- 
stein, but there was also Napoleon and 
even Winston Churchill, who finished 
last in his class at Sandhurst. Then there 
is my patron saint. Hunter Thompson, 
who kept a straight 1.0 average all 
throughout his college career." 



46 





Christmas 

The campus is quite barren. The nor- 
mal buzz of students and activity is 
gone. Those who aren't returning home 
for the holidays are spending most of 
their time skiing or haunting the night 
life track. "Not a creature was stirring 
. . . not even a student." 

I'm remaining in Reno. It isn't as bad 
as other years. The northern Nevada De- 
cember is unusually sunny and warm. 
Friends have even invited me over for 
Christmas turkey. 

It is a far better meal than last year. I 
didn't know anyone last year and end- 
ed up eating dinner at one of the down- 
town casinos that gives free meals to 
the needy on Christmas Day. I wasn't 
destitute, I had a few bucks in my pock- 
et, but I sure felt empty. 

Christmas this year sees the hostages 
in Iran spending their second Christmas 
and 417th day in captivity. It sees gas 
going for $1.30 per gallon. It sees Amer- 
ica elect an arch conservative, an anti- 
intellectual from California to the presi- 
dency. It sees the mood of the people 
shift far to the right. 

The year is ending with the prime 
interest rate at 21 Vi percent, and com- 
puter games becoming one of the big- 
gest gift items. 



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Ski Fever 

UNR is located near some of the best ski areas in 
the nation. It is apparent with the Vuarnet's and 
tanned faces running rampant on campus, and 
the ski racks tacked on top of the parked cars. 

When ski fever hits the aroma of hot wax drifts 
down the halls of Nye and wax shavings are 
spread on laundry room floors. 

Then there's the bunnies. 

"God," the coed lamented. "I've got classes til 
5 p.m., four days of the week this spring semes- 



ter. 



"Sounds rough," Dill said in condolence. "What are you taking that keeps you so busy?" 

"Skiing. Everyday except Monday. I don't know how I'll ever make it. That gives me 14 hours for the 
semester, the biggest load I've taken yet." 

"Ah, yes, the San Diego syndrome." 

"How did you know I'm from San Diego?" she asked. 

"Oh, it's quite obvious. Blond hair, ready to jump out of your thongs and into Nordicas. There's quite a few 
of you here — bored with surfing, so you come up to Reno to go to school or to ski, whatever the case may 
be." 

"You're really quite observant," the slender Californian said. "What's your name?" 

"Dill." 

"Dill, William — Wilhelm. I always thought that had such a romantic sound. Perhaps because it can be 
traced back to the House of the Hohenzollern. 

"Say what," Dill asked, taken off guard by the young lady's intellectualism. 

"You know, the Hohenzollern — the German soldier kings. History is my major." 

"Oh really," Dill said, genuinely intrigued. "Did you know the Visigoths were the first people to actually ski. 
Yes, they would attack the Romans in the forest and then escape on curved planks of wood strapped to their 
feet." 

"Ooh, I like that," she said. 

"Yes, and if you're interested, I've got a genuine Crusader sword at home. I'd be glad to show it to you." 



49 



Spring Registration 



"Well, its finally happening," said Eddie. "Registration is done by computer.'' 

"Yes, well it's not much worse than the old system with the administration," I replied. 

"Yea, I guess you're right, they both only work part of the time." 

"It's kind of like the phone company," Eddie went on. "Last year I was billed for two phone calls to 
Chad for $236. I told the phone company I didn't even know anyone named Chad. They're still trying to 
figure out if it's a person or place." 

"You know, I signed up for boxing - got a card for ballet, and another course in meditation and got a 
card for mining demolitions. But I've decided to keep them both," Eddie said. 

"Oh really, why's that?" 

"Well, I went to the first day of the demolitions class and decided I'd like to blow things up, and then I 
went to ballet and discovered I was the only guy in the class." 




51 




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That's Entertainment 

Perhaps 1980-81 will be remembered not for the movies that 
were, but for the movies that never will be. In a single swipe 
the 1980 grim reaper forever retired the great talents of Peter 
Sellers, Steve McQueen, Mae West and Alfred Hitchcock. No 
further will we be humored by Inspector Clouseau, excuse me, 
Chief Inspector Clouseau, shot at and hunted by the likes of Tom 
Horn and Johnny Yuma, or seduced by the Wiles of Sexy Sadie. 
If this year is showing the film industry anything, it's proving 
with "Airplane" that it doesn't take a Coppolan fortune to 
produce an enjoyable film, nor does $40 million insure that 
"Heaven's Gate" will be anything but terrible. 

Some of the films to remember from this year are "Airplane," 
"Brubaker," inspires one with the thought that perhaps some- 
where, sometime, it is still worthwhile to do something morally 
decent; and "Urban Cowboy," with its excellent soundtrack, 
that has kicked off an epidemic of bucking bronco machine bone 
brakes, and even a Shy Clown suicide when a certain discow- 
boy lost "The Ultimate Urban Cowboy" contest final. 
Other Honorable Mentions this year were: "Private Benjamin," "The Empire Strikes Back," "Heart- 
beat,-" "Dressed to Kill;" "Popeye,-" and "Stir Crazy." 

Here we must also salute the television epic, "Shogun," a first-rate movie, regardless of its industry. 
Movies to forget, except for this last reminder are the "First Deadly Sin,-" "The Awakening," "The Big 
Red One," "Flash Gordon," "Where the Buffalo Roam,-" "The Shining," "Fade to Black," "It's My Turn," 
and "Can't Stop the Music." 

Another show one can make his own decision on is "Dallas," which spawned a flood of records and 
big-time betting over "Who shot J.R." The revealing of Kristine as the assailant was even the lead story 
on the 11 o'clock news. 

And, oh yes. Woody Allen spent a lot of time and money in "Stardust Memories" to tell us something 
we already knew, namely, that we don't want Woody as an avant garde orteest, but instead want to 
keep laughing. We're tired of thinking, make us laugh again. Woody, please! 




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Winter Carnival 

"Snowballin" is the theme of this year's Winter 
Carnival. It's a phrase which receives many inter- 
pretations during carnival days. 

About seven of us decided to head up to Heav- 
enly Valley for some good skiing and bacchana- 
lian festivities. We took Eddie's van, since it could 
carry all the necessary equipment and personnel. 
On the way we amused ourselves by taking re- 
quests and singing songs, since the van's radio 
was on the blink. 

By the time we arrived over the hump and at a gas station in Stateline we were just about out of ideas 
for songs. 
"Any special requests you would like to hear," I asked the gas station attendent. 
He didn't seem too interested and simply said, "Ah, it don't matter to me." Immediately the entire 
van joined in the chorus, "It don't matter to me, if you really love him ..." It was quite a comical and 
spontaneous response. Even the frozen gas station attendant had to laugh. 
But, I guess you had to be there. 

Rivalry at the top of the Heavenly tram produced a season's worth of college drunks working on 
university degrees. And of course, there were the usual festivities. The highlight of the week was when 
the floor collapsed during the dance. Of course, with all the beer I drank, I hardly noticed. 

The ice skating party was well attended, with the novices taking their disproportionate amount of spills 
and bruises. The intertube racers came whisking down the hills, and the snow sculptures were built with 
their usual finesse. 



5- 



Music 



"The dorms are alive with the sound of 
music ..." 

The year in music saw old favorites back 
on the charts, and the emergence of new 
cult heroes as the political mood of the 
country changed. 

After acid and punk and Americans be- 
ing taken hostage in Iran, where do you 
go? Back to the basics — apple pie, Amer- 
ica, Ronald Reagan and war. 

The soundtrack from "Urban Cowboy" 
brought a not so new genre to the the 
music forefront - country rock. Boz Scaggs 
with "Look what You've Done to Me," 
Charlie Daniel's Band - "The Devil Went 
Down to Georgia," Mickey Gilley — "Stand 
by Me," and Joe Walsh with "All Night 
Long," all contributed to make a fine and 
entertaining album. 

In November Kenny Rogers came out 
with another super-hit, destined to become 
a classic: "Lady." The Charlie Daniels Band 
caught the mood of the country (and the 
Pittsburgh Steelers), in his second hit of the 
year: "You never thought it could happen 
again in America." 

December saw Lennon and old Beatle 
album sales soar, and the 80-81 music year 
saw one of the first records on masturba- 
tion reach the top ten: "I'm Turning Japa- 
nese." 




58 




59 




60 






Springtime 



The campus and surrounding areas are beautiful when spring makes its way to Nevada. 

Crisp spring mornings and warm afternoons greet students as they walk to their classes. The trees lining 
the quad begin getting leaves and the grass starts to turn green. The flowers that line many of the 
university's brick buildings begin to bloom, adding their beautiful colors to the campus. 

In the Sierras the snow has begun to melt. The red bark and green leaves of manzanita which dots the 
mountains begins to poke through. The snow runs off the mountains in the form of water, into cold clear 
streams, which are found throughout the mountains. 

The Truckee River begins to rise and turn muddy and Lake Tahoe's ice-cold water starts warming up, 
but still not enough for swimming. 




61 




62 




63 



Survival 



Our winter survival class was having 
a three day camping trip for the final. 
And as with all other finals, it started out 
bad and got worse. 

We put on our skis and packs and 
skied five miles to our destination— a fro- 
zen pond. 

Being great outdoorsmen, we built a 
snow shelter while everybody pitched 
their tents. Eddie chopped snow blocks 
and I stacked. Two hours later, voila! It 
was finished. We put our skis on top, 
place plastic over them for the roof and 
climbed into our custom made Hilton to 
go to sleep. 

About midnight I heard Eddie "I'm 
freezing. The wind's blowing through 
the hole in the blocks, there's snow in 
my sleeping bag, I keep sliding out the 
door and I wanna go home!'' 

"I can't take it. I'll fake appendicitis, 
I'll say I hurt my knee, I'll say I'm preg- 
nant ..." 

"Go back to sleep — you won't feel the 
cold. We'll talk to the instructor tomor- 
row. 

"If we survive, "Eddie moaned as he 
rolled over. I decided to go back to sleep 
too since I was freezing and didn't want 
to be awake when the roof blew away. 



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"Ah, this is my time of the year," 
Eddie said as he stretched out on the 
lawn. "I love to lay here in Manzanita 
bowl, on my fuzzy blue terry cloth 
towel, slap on the cocoanut sun tan 
oil and observe the wildlife." 

"I didn't know you were so interest- 
ed in birds," I said in my usual fault- 
less style. 

"I'm not. I sit here and watch yon- 
der objects of the feminine disposition 
meandering about the bowl in all of 
their regal splendor." 

"Regal splendor?" 

"Sure," Eddie answered. "Shorts, 
bathing suits, skimpy tops - what a 
life. It's kind of like the swallows that 
return to Capistrano every year. 
These beauties return to the bowl an- 
nually to rejoice in the warm sun- 
shine. And I, being the loyal subject to 
nature that I am, fulfill my obligation 
and eturn also." 

"What a kind and self-sacrificing 
heart you have," I told Eddie as I sat 
down next to him to watch the cute 
little chickadee 10 feet away 

Oh yesss! 




68 




69 







I 




7 A 




Mackay Days 

The Mackay Days celebration got off to its usual 
start. Everything was nice, but typical. 

"Herbie, one of these days we'll have a real 
celebration," Eddie said. "Enough of this beer 
drinking and raft riding. I mean, let's do something 
really representative of Nevada. Let's turn the 
Education Building into a casino.'' 

Ma and Pa Mackay were chosen,- there was the 
Mackay School of Mines gorgeous legs contest, 
the egg toss and three-legged races,- Coffin and 
Keys littered the campus with their droll fliers,- 
there were the raft races on Manzanita Lake and 
the pie eating contests,- the ROTC department 
sponsored its rapelling exhibition,- the barbecue in 
the quad was a success— no food poisoning,- and 
the waterhose fight left everyone in high spirits. If 
it didn't, the Coors and Budweiser did. And, as 
with most years, everyone under 21 became mer- 
rily drunk. 

"I suppose we could call it a successful year,'' 
Eddie commented. 

"How do you mean," I asked. 

"The carp only ate three people." 



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Conclusions 



"I made it. I can't believe it. Pinch me, I'm in shock. I'm going to graduate." 

"Calm down Hermie. You're embarrassing me. If you're going to scream and yell do it somewhere else, but 
not in the snack bar." 

"I'm sorry. But I can't help it," I replied. "I'm so happy." Then the stark reality hit. No more weekend 
parties. No more sleeping til noon and then getting up for my one o'clock class. I would have to get a real job. 
I would have to be to work at nine in the morning. Nine in the morning! I would have to buy a home, and a 
car. I would have to get married and hear the pitter patter of future preppy's running around the house. And 
what was worse, I would have to start paying back my student loans. 

But, why should I worry? I have a college degree. I'm prepared to go out into the big, cruel world. I had 
successfully passed the 128 credits required of me to graduate (although many times I wondered if it was 
really worth all of the time and money). I had a decent GPA, and I had even received a varsity letter. What 
more could God and my country ask of me? 

But even with all of that power behind me I was feeling kind of empty inside. 

"Remember when we were freshmen," I said to Eddie. "It took me two hours before I knew what I was 
doing during registration and by the time I figured it out, all of the classes I wanted were cancelled. 
Remember going to the football games and sitting by whoever had the keg? I still don't know who won the 
games." 

"Yeh," Eddie reminisced. "I remember when we actually had to start doing homework when we were 
sophomores. I think that was the worse year of my life!" 

"And what about last year. We had to declare a major and then start working on the core requirements. To 
think, I may have actually learned something in my field." 

"Will miracles never cease to exist?" 

"Very funny Eddie, What about this year. Finally finishing those silly classes that I should have taken as a 
freshman." 

"This year has been really interesting," I went on. "The U.S. hockey team winning the gold medal over the 
Russians; the boycott of the Summer Olympics because of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan; reinstatement of 
the draft; new rings found around Saturn; Poland's labor strikes; Abscam,- yellow ribbons tied all over cars and 
trees in Reno to honor the hostages in Iran,- Cuban refugees; Mount St. Helens erupting; J.R.; Abby Hoffman 
coming out of hiding after six years; the beautiful girls; John Lennon; the beautiful girls; no snow for Christmas; 
the space shuttle, the beautiful girls ..." 

"I've got the picture," Eddie said. "It has been an exciting year. At our Golden Reunion we can look back at 
all of this, that is if there's not a nuclear war, and reminisce." 




'Just think," I went on "after graduation it will 
be quite awhile before I drive down Virginia 
Street into the stadium parking lot and try to find a 
space." 

"That's one thing I certainly won't miss," Eddie 
added. 

"I wonder if students will still be the same as 
we were," I asked. 

"Probably," Eddie replied. "They'll sit in their 
philosophy class and do crossword puzzles like we 
did. They'll probably write their midterm and term 
papers the night before they are due and then 
stay up typing them until five o'clock the next 
morning. They'll probably sit in their lecture 
classes and do the homework that is due for the 
next class period, and when it comes time to 
study they will probably think the most that they 
have thought all year for a way to get out of 
doing it." 

"When they have a test on Wednesday they'll 
stay up Tuesday night and go over all of the 
readings that were assigned on the first day of 
class on the syllabus the teacher handed out." 

"They'll sneak their friends into the football games by passing their student activity cards through the fence 
after they have already entered the stadium. They'll try to sneak liquor into the game in old jugs, water 
bottles and thermoses, which they'll stuff into their coats and hide in ice chests. And, there will still be the ones 
who go for the gusto and try to sneak kegs into the games. They'll try bringing them in the night before, 
slipping them under or over the fences, hiding them in garbage cans and some will still use a decoy keg to get 
their real one into the stands. Isn't it something what one can learn to do during their college years?" 
"I can see where the majority of your college time was spent Eddie," I said, as though I was innocent. 
"There will probably still be that strange breed, which are hard to find, that actually come to the university 
to receive an education," Eddie said. "I've only met a couple of them. Kind of weird if you ask me." 



78 



"True, true," I said in agreement. "There will still be the ones who live in the dorms and pull the fire 
alarms so they can sit in their cars laughing as they watch everyone pile out of the building in their night 
clothes and curlers. Warped sense of humor, I guess." 

"But, what's even more probable than that is there will still be the student's who keep all of the local 
bars in business when they go to drown their sorrows after seeing their midterm grades. Kind of like you 
and me," Eddie added. There was more truth to that statement than anything else he had said. 
"Well, what now," I asked. "I don't really feel like going home yet." 
"Me either. Let's go build up our biceps with some 12 and 16 ounce curls." 

"That's one thing about you Eddie, always building those muscles to keep in shape," I joked as we left 
the snack bar. 

The snack bar food, I thought to myself. There's another thing that I'm sure won't change and I'm 
positive I won't miss. 




79 



101 ■ 








4 



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II IMS 



Volleyball 




CGAO/ ANNETTEE COTTLE 



"This year we played a lot of games out of our division, and that's tough. Because if you have a bad weekend you can lose 
four or five games. 

"We have a very young team, but they really surprised me and are doing very well. Our goal for this year is to finish as one 
of the top four teams in our division. 

"I think our future looks very promising - being we've been so competitive this year. 

"Right now we're trying to balance our team. There are several skill areas in volleyball and each has to be mastered in 
order to have a good all-around player. We're trying to get each player up to a competitive level in each skill area. 

"There are great things to come for this team, but then again all coaches say that." 






82 




: 



83 



1960-31 Volleyball 



NAME 


HOMETOWN 


Andrea Adamson 


Verdi 


Robin Christen 


Reno 


Letty Curiel 


Live Ook, CA 


Pam Greiner 


Littleton, CO 


Shana Honey 


Rolling Hills, CA 


Tomi Henderson 


Toft, CA 


Krista Jenkins 


Reno 


Melissa Macfadyen 


Sonto Monico, CA 


Lynn Ann Ralston 


Reno 


Rochelle Rose 


Reno 


Carol Roth 


Reno 


Stacy Rudin 


Las Vegas 


Greta Stock 


Elko 


Carol Talhot 


Reno 



84 




Women's Cross Country 




■■•■ «% 



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COACH /CEV7A/ CHRISTENSEN 



"The cross country team is a division II team. It has done very well in its first few years of existence, with several outstanding 
individual performances. Our first year we finished 10th in the Stanford Invitationals, which was very good considering there 
were 24 teams entered. We also finished 18th out of the 30 schools which qualified for the nationals. 

Special mention is deserved by Terry Schmidt. Terry has been undefeated within her own squad, she was also the national 
champion and helped the team to win the team title which produced eight Ail-Americans: Terry Schmidt, Jill Smith, Julie 
Valentine, Michelle Dioguardi, Lauri Drantingham, Rhonda Reed, Paula Edgington and Jocelyn Roberts." 



85 



1980 Women's Cross Country 



NAME 

Kim Berkshire 
Laurie Dissett 
Laurie Drantingham 
Carol Dennis 
Michelle Dioguardi 
Paula Edging ton 
Tina Edgington 
Jackie Fulton 
Peggy Nelson 
Kimmer Reed 
Rhonda Reed 
Jocelyn Roberts 
Terry Schmidt 
Jill Smith 
Julie Valentine 
Debbie Rudolph 
Lisa Aufdermauen 



HOMETOWN 

Redlands, CA 

Reno 

Day ton 

Reno 

Los Vegos 

Reno 

Reno 

Reno 

Conby, MIN 

Reno 

Reno 

Lake Tahoe 

Reno 

Winnemucco 

Reno 

Susanville 

Lovelock 







86 



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Baseball 




COACHES DEL YOUNGDLOOD AND CHUCK MOHR 

"This year would have fo be colled o rebuilding year, since we lost 24 of 34 seniors from lost year. But we will have 18 
junior college transfers coming to UNR, and we feel these particular players will really strengthen our defense and pitching. 

"We were in sore need of left handed pitchers and we think Don Groh, who is a JC transfer, and Greg Shrope will help us out 
greatly. Center field will be a very strong position, ployed by Mondel Williams who has turned down draff offers from the Son 
Diego Padres and the Toronto Dluejays. Left field will also be strong, ployed by Jim Harris, who turned down a draft offer from 
the Mets. 

This year again we will play in the Northern California Daseboll Association, and we think we will certainly be in the 
running for the pennant. 

"We think there will be a lot of surprises this year even though we are concentrating on rebuilding. We have quite a few 
Ail-American prospects, not to mention those who have already been offered pro contracts." 



88 




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89 



1961 Baseball 



NAME 



HOMETOWN 



Dove Anderson 
Randy Drunet 
Don Groh 
Barry Kuzminski 
Trent Lee 
Joe Nady 
Greg Shrope 
Steve Trovers 
Kip Wolfe 
Tony Shanks 
Jime Stassi 
Pot Zunini 
Greg Campbell 
Allen Grubb 
Andy Miller 
Fred Moreno 
Dob Norren 
Jerry Raw son 
Jim Warner 
Wayne Brandon 
Dan Farano 
Jim Ferfuson 
Jim Harris 
Jim Pappos 



Fairbanks, AL 

Reno 

West Covina, CA 

Waskatenau, Alberta, CAN 

Eugene, OR 

Faifield, IA 

Lake wood, CO 

San Anselmo, CA 

Lower Durrell, PA 

Reno 

Yuba City, CA 

Reno 

Sunnyvale, CA 

Turlock, CA 

Reno 

Avondale, AZ 

Yuba City, CA 

Yerrington 

Reno 

Las Vegas 

Henderson 

Madera, CA 

Chico, CA 

Yuba City, CA 



COACHES 
Rich Jameson 
Chuck Mohr 
Del Youngblood 



90 




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Basketball 




COACH SONNY ALLEN 



'Naturally, this being my first year at UNR, and fielding almost a completely new team, there can't be too many high 
hopes. If we do better than a 500 season, I'll feel we have accomplished something. 

"We've hod some adverse publicity to overcome from last year, but this is a whole new ball club with many fine players, 
and in the next few years I believe UNR will be a top conference contender. 

"Our goal this year is to finish in the top four of our division. We've done very well in all of our games and have never had a 
poor showing. Right now we have to work on balancing the team. But this is a nice area, and I intend on staying for awhile. 
We'll be producing winners real soon." 



<u 




93 




1980-61 Basketball 



No. 


Name 


Hometown 


24 


Tony Dologun 


Brooklyn. NY 


52 


Dino Delluomini 


Alameda, CA 


50 


Rod Dingier 


San Diego, CA 


12 


D-D Fontenent 


Phoenix, AZ 


22 


Gosse Rick 


Reno, NV 


42 


Eddie Johnson 


Oakland, CA 


23 


Mike Legarza 


Reno, NV 


10 


Robert Martin 


Oakland, CA 


44 


Greg Palm 


Southland, Ml 


34 


Rovan Turner 


Sacramento, CA 



I 



94 






Women's Softball 




Softboll/OCD 



COACH OLINA PLUMMER 



"It's hard to soy just how the team will do this year. We lost quite o few players from last year, and some of the key players 
I was counting on to return haven't been able to do so for one reason or another. 

"| feel we will have strong pitching again this year, and that's always a must for a successful team. Last year we had a 
fantastic team, and it will be hard to duplicate that record, but I think we have the potential. We have some very strong and 
talented players, and generally it will be a young team. But I still believe if will be a strong team, and in the next few seasons 
to come we will be extremely tough. 

"Our goal this year will be to get into the playoffs or at least finish in the top few teams of our league. That would be a very 
good showing for a team in a rebuilding year." 



96 




Softboll/JN 



97 



Tennis/ DW 




98 




. 1' • 

******* 




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Tennis/ DW 



99 



1960-81 Men's Tennis 




MEN'S TENNIS ROSTER 



NAME 



HOMETOWN 



Robert T. Buck 
Daniel G. Burnett 
David Owen Earl 
Glenn Arthur Erickson 
Arnold G. DiGeorge 
Scott D. Knutzen 
Mark G. Littrell 
Chris A. Long 
Brian McQuown 
Peter H. Oskam 
Robert C Porter 
Thomas K. Steingraber 
Steve C. Tourdo 
David M. Williams 
Ray Robert 



Lemmon Valley 
Sparks 

Modesto, CA 
Palm Springs, CA 
Las Vegas 
Reno 

Oceanside, CA 
Albuquerque, NM 
Durbank, CA 
Incline 

So. Lake Tahoe 
Modesto, CA 
Dearnardsville, NJ 
Clearwater, FL 
Reno 



100 




Tennis /DW 




/ b 



Tennis/BW 



101 



Golf 



COACH JOHN LEGARZA 

"We definitely hove a team that can compete against anybody. We're a small school, and 
it's tough competing against UCLA, USC and DYU, but I think we can hold our own. 

"In the fall season we finished fifth in the Wolf Pack Classic, and that's not bad out of 16 
universities, considering some of the schools in the tournament were some of the best golf schools 
in the nation. 

"Matt Plumlee, a freshman, will be a great asset to the team this year. Plumlee has already 
won a large tournament for stroke play in Las Vegas this year, and I think he's a possible All- 
American. 

"We have a very young team, but I think we could finish first or second in the conference - it 
will be between UNR and Weber State.'' 



102 




Golf/OCD 



GOLF TEAM 
1961 



Mike Allen 
Dana Donke 
Matt Doumonn 
Lee Dosch 
John Connell 
Rick Hutchins 
Rick Levie 
Deon Menonte 
Derrick Tortoglio 
Kirk Tripleft 
Matt Plumblee 

Coach: 

John Legarza 



103 



1961 Women's Tennis 




COACH ELAINE DELLER 



"Like many other teams at UNR this year, the tennis team is rebuilding. We lost 
four of our storting players this year, and have a very young team. 

"We will play a lot of Division I schools this year, so we hope to survive with a 
winning season. We'll be relying on returning players Sheralynn Irving and Jamie 
Brooks to help carry the team through. 

"One of our biggest problems with winning any titles is that the regionals are 
always held during finals. Rather than fall behind in studies, most of the girls vote 
for taking the exams rather than going to the tournament. 

"But whatever we do we are quite strong, and should finish in the top 12 teams 
for the division." 



NAME 


HOMETOWN 


Jacqueline V. Deim 


Las Vegas 


Jamie K. Brooke 


Sparks 


Laura D. Desimone 


Reno 


Stacy C. Dolan 


Reno 


Mary J. Fry 


Las Cruses, NM 


Kim M. Garcia 


Sparks 


Laurie A. Hitchins 


Las Vegas 


Sheralynn Irving 


Alamdea, CA 


Kathleen C. Parraguirre 


Reno 


Deborah J. See vers 


Reno 


Kristi Walters 


Reno 


COACH Elaine Deller 


Reno 



104 



M& 



~\ 




Tennis/ DW 




Tennis/ BW 



Men 5 Skiing 





Skiing/SF 



COACH KEVIN CHRISTENSEN 



"I'm very happy with the progress of the ski team. In 1979 UNR finished 16th in the notion and lost year we finished 13th. I'm 
hoping to finish in the top 10 this year. 

"One individual that stands out is Roger Lancaster who has brought much success to the team. Roger has been the top seated 
skier since he was a sophomore. I'd also like to mention Tom Ewald. Tom was the first American skier from UNR in the past decade to 
score points at the NCAA's. 

"The team is on the rise and will soon have a nordic team to stand up to the nations best and that will be the time when UNR 
could be in the top five in the nation." 



Km 




Skiing/SF 



109 



1980-61 Women's Basketball 




Basketball/JN 



COACH CINDY ROCK 



For such q young team I think we will do well. It's o rebuilding year, since we 
don't hove any seniors. And since we ore building and learning I will be ploying o 
lot of people to see what they con do. A few of the team's outstanding players are 
Marie Dendary, Ellen Yroguin and Stephanie Swonson. Much of the success of the 
year will depend two of our key players Carlo Dennett and Mary Cusic. 

"We're aiming at having at least a 50 percent win overage, and I think we 

should providing there ore no injuries and the girls play up to their capabilities. 

"We have a 24-game schedule, and I hope we con come up with the right 

combination to get us through the season. We have some very good players to 

build o good future with." 



NAME 

Carlo Dennett 
Janet Dethell 
Barbara Dothelho 
Laurie Burns 
Cathy Chapman 
Mary Cusic 
Renee DeJean 
Marie Dendary 
Janice Jones 
Karen Locke 
Lisa Pennino 
Theresa Perkins 
Kelly Peters 
Bridget Robb 
Stephanie Swanson 
Sheila Wilburn 
Ellen Yraguen 



HOMETOWN 

Reno 

Placerville, CA 

Smith Valley 

Carmichael, CA 

Susanville, CA 

Battle Creek, Ml 

Denver, CO 

Reno 

San Francisco 

Los Angeles 

Incline 

Reno 

Los Vegas 

Tonopah 

Denver, CO 

Battle Creek, Ml 

Carlin. NV 



ill 




113 



Swimming 




COACH JERR Y DALLEW 



This was by for fhe most successful season we've had in five years, especially since 9 of the 16 teams we faced were Division I 



teams. 



"We've had nine girls qualify for the nationals, that's quite a few. 

"If we stay healthy we should finish as one of the top five teams in the country. Last year UNR finished 19th after losing Mary 
Mirch, our top swimmer, to an injury. 



I 



"We should do well in the nationals. We've had some of our girls qualify for the relays, and that's where the points are. 
"We've certainly come a long way in five years. When I first started I recrutied any girl who could swim. Now we're national 
contenders." 



114 



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116 




117 



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Boxing /D W 






<*» *f- : 




COACH y/MM r OLIVAS 

"I feel quite certain that UNR will take the NCAA championship this year. We have a strong team with a lot of depth. We also 
have a few national semi-finalist from last year's nationals returning. Mark Romero and Lenny Mayorga have a very good chance 
winning a national title. 

"Our biggest problem will be the military academies. Last year we lost to the Air Force, but we shouldn't have. We had some bad 
decisions, but I don't think we will have that problem this year. 

"My only concern is that boxing remains a team sport and is not forced to become a club. The boxing team has overall the highest 
academic and most successful athletic record of any of the teams; it wouldn't be fair to drop it. 

"But I think boxing is eternal. Wherever you go, whenever there is a fight there is a crowd of people watching.'' 



118 




Boxing/ BW 



119 



Cross Country, Indoor And Outdoor Track 




COACH JACK COOK 



"This year's cross country team was one of the two best I have seen here in 13 years. We were undefeated in all invitational and 
dual meets, and won the Dig Sky Conference for the second year in a row. We finished 17th in the NCAA I out of the 27 teams who 
qualified for the national event. The team had six Ail-Americans including Jairo Correa, Joaquin Leano, Rudy Munoz, Peter Elleston, 
Jorgen Eiremo and Danny Navarro. All of those, except Leano, will run indoor/outdoor also. 

"If the team is in good health, we will be very strong in indoor track this year. Returning is Lane Maestretti, who was the Big Sky 
pole vaulting champ last year, and Jan Miakaellson, who was last year's Big Sky javelin champ. 

"Most of the same runners who are in indoor will compete in outdoor competition as well. Noah Levingston will be a strong 
competitior this year,- last year he finished 2nd in the 60 for indoors and 3rd in the same event outdoors. I think Maestretti has a good 
chance at making Ail-American pole vaulter, and Lars Welander should be strong in the intermediate hurdles. 

"The Big Sky Conference is tough to win anything in. No one team dominates everything. But I'm very hopeful we will take the 
conference this year in both indoor and outdoor.'' 



120 



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Football 




COACH CHRIS AULT 



"The 1980 season was without o doubt the most challenging of the five seasons I have coached at UNR. Though the team 
finished only 6-4-1, I was pleased with the way the team overcame a great deal of adversity and won the last two games. 

"This year there were only 11 seniors, so we had to overcome the problems of fielding a young team. We also had some 
injuries which hurt us a great deal. But most of all, the team overcame low morale and went out winners. For UNR 6-4-1 is a 
losing season, and our players are not used to losing. 

"The defensive team did a great job this year, and was named the nation's number one defensive team against a run. The 
defense was highlighted by Bubba Puha, who picked up the slack. 

"The team had a great deal to be proud of. It was a memorable experience for me and the team to work with Frank 
Hawkins. I feel Frank is a great tribute both to the school and the state of Nevada, and I don't think we will see such a 
performance again for at least a few years. 

"I was most pleasantly surprised by freshman Tony Shaw, who worked his way into the number one kicking position, and 
went one to lead the conference in scoring. 

"And we are all proud of the fact that three of this year's teammembers will be joining the pro ranks: Frank Hawkins, Bubba 
Puha and Eric Sanders.'' 



124 



1930 Football Roster 



No. 
60 
7 
12 
62 
14 
32 
58 
28 
22 
47 
42 
50 

68 
90 
11 
77 
49 
79 
56 
86 
76 
46 
13 
65 
27 
5 
15 
24 
40 
19 
31 
73 
87 
52 
59 



30 

83 
53 
64 
84 
72 
74 
66 
71 
63 
99 
48 
44 
78 
45 
85 
43 
67 
23 
88 
54 
57 
26 
21 
33 
10 
20 
61 
18 
70 
81 



NAME 
Phil Adorns 
Dob Angius 
Jeff Ardito 
Lorry Dck 
Charles Dockover 
Dove Buich 
Mike Campbell 
Conrad Clark 
Jimmy Clark 
Fred Cooper 
Anthony Corley 
Craig Cosgrove 
Jim Cudworth 
Rick Edwards 
Neil Fine 
Kevin Fontes 
Wait Frazier 
Greg Fulton 
Melvin Gentry 
John Goldsborough 
Dill Grovert 
Dob Hamm 
Kelly Hordiman 
Morris Harper 
Rick Harris 
Frank Hawkins 
Mark Henderson 
David Heppe 
Mike Honeycutt 
Gary Jackson 
Jeff Jones 
Otto Kelly 
Deredk Kennord 
Al King 
Steve Knapp 
Miles Kusoyongi 
Ftank Lepori 
John Loy 
Mickey Lucas 
Don Maloy 
Charles Mann 
Tom McCarthy 
Mike McGowan 
Dubbo Melcher 
Greg Miller 
Mike Miller 
Dee Monson 
Lorry Pierce 
David Porter 
Dubba Puha 
Mike Ouilici 
John Ramotici 
Eric Sanders 
Joe Saunders 
Tony Show 
Ollie Simpson 
Jeff Spencer 
Rollins Stollwotth 
Gory Terrell 
Steve Ting 
Mike Turk 
Rene Vallejo 
John Vicari 
Mike West 
Kevin Wheeler 
Tim Wigmore 
Todd Wilcks 
Alphonso Williams 
Dwoyne Witzmno 
Steve Worman 



POSITION 

DT 

QD 

QD 

SE 

K 

S 

DE 

S 

WD 

CD 

RD 

C 

LD 

OG 

LD 

SE 

OT 

S 

OG 

LD 

DT 

DT 

CD 

RD 

OG 

FD 

S 

QD-P 

CD 

RD 

WD 

FD 

OT 

TE 

LD 

LD 

LD 

TE 

CD 

RD 

DT 

C 

DT 

TE 

DT 

OtT 

NG 

DT 

OT 

NG 

FD 

LD 

OT 

CD 

S 

S 

OG 

S 

LD 

LD 

C 

RD 

RD 

DE 

QD 

SE 

OG 

SE 

NG 

SE 



HOMETOWN 
Doise, ID 
Susonville, CA 
Tohoe City, CA 
Dinubo, CA 
Livermore, CA 
Clayton, CA 
Oakland, CA 
Stockton, CA 
Escondido, CA 
Seaside, CA 
Spatks, NV 
Stockton, CA 
Reno, NV 
Ftesno, CA 
Carmichael, CA 
Sacramento, CA 
Fresno, CA 
Anchorage, AL 
Detroit, Ml 
Monterey, CA 
Sacramento, CA 
Son Jose, CA 
Livermore, CA 
Sacramento, CA 
Tahoe City, CA 
Las Vegas, NV 
Reno, NV 
Nevada City, CA 
Sacramento, CA 
McDonald, PA 
Los Angeles, CA 
Henderson, NV 
Stockton, CA 
Derkeley, CA 
Sacramento, CA 
Covina, CA 
Reno, CA 
Sparks, NV 
Las Vegas, NV 
Reno, NV 
Sacramento, CA 
Reno, NV 
RedDluff, CA 
Reno, NV 
Monterey, CA 
Pacifica, CA 
Covina, CA 
Son Jose, CA 
Pomona, CA 
Honolulu, HI 
Reno, NV 
Santa Rosa, CA 
Reno, NV 
Reno, NV 
Las Vegas, NV 
Sacramento, CA 
Sacramento, CA 
Merced, CA 
Sacramento, CA 
Verki, NV 
Sacramento, CA 
Cotton, CA 
E. Detroit, Ml 
Concord, CA 
Milpitas, CA 
Fountain Valley, CA 
Minden, NV 
Long Deach, CA 
Upland, CA 
Saratoga, CA 



125 



MMH 







Football/MH 



126 




Football/MH 







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Footboll/JN 



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130 




Cheers 1930/ DW 




131 




More Fons/JN 




134 




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136 





137 




Relaxing/MH 



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138 



'ACME 




139 



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141 




142 





143 



144 




Football/MH 



IIVINC 



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Alpha Chi Omega 




146 




1. 


Anne Lienou 


19. 


Michelle Mortimore 


37. 


Anna Cherry 


2. 


Jill Smith 


20. 


Kary Lutz 


38. 


Julie Coit 


3. 


Vicki Cose 


21. 


Becky Wynn 


39. 


Lori Needenriep 


4. 


Patrice Nelsen 


22. 


Verna Davig 


40. 


Lisa Neddenriep 


5. 


Laura Allen 


23. 


Holly Wright 


41. 


Mrs. Thinger, housemom 


6. 


Liz Carter 


24. 


Kelly Scott 


42. 


Theresa Kimball 


7. 


Lisa Scott 


25. 


Michelle Caruso 


43. 


Karen Wolfe 


8. 


Katie Eymann 


26. 


Heidi Holt 


44. 


Diane Vogt 


9. 


Dev Lewis 


27. 


Heidi Takenaka 


45. 


Mary Eymann 


10. 


Allison Reynolds 


28. 


Julie Ferguson 


46. 


Vicky Sauer 


11. 


Lisa Dranccuci 


29. 


Dallas Waters 


47. 


Venetia Sauer 


12. 


Peggy Humphrey 


30. 


Lynn Evans 


48. 


Lisa Foster 


13. 


Goylene Gott 


31 


Lori Foote 


49. 


Debbie Loop 


14. 


Ginny Sauer 


32. 


Amy Barton 


50. 


Karen Torvinen 


15. 


Suzanne Bowman 


33. 


Pam Gould 


51. 


Suzetfe Gochie 


16. 


Shannon Bristol 


34. 


Beth Morrow 


52. 


Renee Paddock 


17. 


Debby Hambleton 


35. 


Denise LeCaer 


53. 


Lori Stetler 


1S. 


Lori Latham 


36. 


Terri Mattingly 







147 



Alpha Chi Omega 



148 




Delta Delta Delta 




Activities Fair, Foil 1980 



149 



1. Shelly Horon 


15. 


Kim Graf 


28. 


Tami Romelli 


41. 


Jane Forman 


54. 


Candy Crabtree 


2. Jill Doss 


16. 


Shari Vingis 


29. 


Nancy Long 


42. 


Dana O'Day 


55. 


Margy Rosso 


3. Michel© Speck 


17. 


Jenni O'Brien 


30. 


Tommy Mentaberry 


43. 


Kim Stoll 


56. 


Kara Chubb 


4. Patty Swottz 


18. 


Polly Kusik 


31. 


DeDe Dunlap 


44. 


Laura Hewitt 


57. 


Laurie Rogers 


5. Reevi Sullivan 


19. 


Janet Hill 


32. 


Suzie Pittenger 


45. 


Diane Davis 


58. 


Jennifer Lunt 


6. Leslie Drokow 


20. 


Lisa Drown 


33. 


Cae Pennington 


46. 


Angela Trueba 


59. 


Jane Overcasher 


7. Cathy Trounday 


21. 


Kristen Nelson 


34. 


Janeen Samplowski 


47. 


Shelly Pozzi 


60. 


Kathy MacKenzie 


8. Pam Lewis 


22. 


Jeri Schwartz 


35. 


Joy Allison 


48. 


Corinne Stott 


61 


Mary Jacques 


9. Sharon Mazzaferri 


23. 


Debbie Mentaberry 


36. 


Andrea Menicucci 


49. 


Lisa Peel 


62. 


Theresa Ponton 


10. Sandy Madura 


24. 


Connie Eichhorn 


37. 


Debbie Prina 


50. 


Diane Sekiguchi 


63. 


Karen Porter 


11. Debbie Glaun 


25. 


Jacki Swobe 


38. 


Cindy Kersey 


51. 


Mari Jo Rowon 


64. 


Margaret Sharp 


12. Danielle Freedman 


26. 


Vicki Senini 


39. 


Sandra Wolf 


52. 


Paige Lubra 


65. 


Melissa Sharp 


13. Kathy Speck 


27. 


Rene Klapper 


40. 


Maggie Hambidge 


53. 


Cobi Dernord 


66. 


Alexandria Tuccori 


14. Paula McCaffety 




















151 




Gamma Phi Beta 



152 




1. 


Carlo Thomas 


15. 


Jan Matula 


29. 


Laurel Jeske 


2. 


Nancy Geis 


16. 


Alina Recasens 


30. 


Laurie Chapman 


3. 


Lynn Semenza 


17. 


LeAnn Tucker 


31. 


Debbie Merrill 


4. 


Defsy MacDiarmid 


18. 


Sherrie Brantingham 


32. 


Kathy Jones 


5. 


Karen Deal 


19. 


Clary Simmonds 


33. 


Trica Freese 


6. 


Leslie Graves 


20. 


Tommy Durbin 


34. 


Chris Martin 


7. 


DeAnn Anderson 


21. 


Laurie Hoyden 


35. 


Tammy Abernathy 


8. 


Melody Gough 


22. 


Nina Files 


36. 


Amy Renner 


9. 


Lori Givani 


23. 


Karen Kolberg 


37. 


Condi Shelver 


10. 


Kafhy Herb 


24. 


Elaine Guenoga 


38. 


Tommy Tomaso 


11. 


Mary Jo Hayes 


25. 


Char Gates 


39. 


Wendy Hunter 


12. 


Barbara Tankersley 


26. 


Heidi Hand 


40. 


Lisa Mather 


13. 


Bobbie Wiley 


27. 


Becky Grover 


41. 


Dawn Tuffanelli 


14. 


Susan Milani 


28. 


Kris Short 


42. 


Sandy Clark 



153 



Gamma Phi Beta 



154 




Kappa Alpha Theta 




155 




1. 


Laurie Dissert 


20. 


Renee Curti 


39. 


Laurie Lincoln 


48. 


Kay Fundis 


2. 


Paula Edgington 


21. 


Alison Trigero 


40. 


Sonja Stasenko 


59. 


Kathy Dohr 


3. 


Laura Desimone 


22. 


Kathy Wegren 


41. 


Tina Edgington 


60. 


Detsy Yound 


4. 


Kim Taylor 


23. 


Chris Thomas 


42. 


Debbie Seevers 


61. 


Kris Willison 


5. 


Susan Jepson 


24. 


Anne Wilson 


43. 


Gret Hasie 


62. 


Kerri Dorman 


6. 


Sherri Stone 


25. 


Teri Arden 


44. 


Debbie Callahan 


63. 


Michelle Dibitonto 


7. 


Michelle Sturm 


26. 


Tana Friede 


45. 


Greta Stock 


64. 


Jeanne Pomi 


8. 


Gail Quarisa 


27. 


Carrie Orcutt 


46. 


Gail Massey 


65. 


Michelle Colbert 


9. 


Laurie McNulty 


28. 


Maizie Whalen 


47. 


Laura Frenkle 


66. 


Annie West 


10. 


Kim Kilsollins 


29. 


Patty Wilson 


48. 


Mary-Rose Kenney 


67. 


Cathy Clements 


11. 


Debi Pmmerening 


30. 


Penni Stone 


49. 


Maureen Heydon 


68. 


Susie Gray 


12. 


Lisa Walen 


31. 


Kim Garcia 


50. 


Luey Darta 


69. 


Suzie Rucker 


13. 


Tammy Duxbury 


32. 


Kathy Dell 


51. 


Kellie Wegren 


70. 


Cathy Arden 


14. 


Chris Dyars 


33. 


Darb Buckley 


52. 


Kim Harney 


71. 


Kitty Mentaberry 


15. 


Cathy Heydon 


34. 


Paige Wilkes 


53. 


Tricia Westergard 


72. 


Cheri Goble 


16. 


Vicki Olson 


35. 


Karen Knutzen 


54. 


Syndee Ramsey 


73. 


Debbie Ewart 


17. 


Jennifer Peters 


36. 


Jennifer Iratcabal 


55. 


DeeDee Arnold 


74. 


Liz Morrow 


18. 


Kothy Parraguirre 


37. 


Shelly Marsh 


56. 


Kerri McCulloch 






19. 


Martha Krump 


38. 


Kathy Quinn 


57. 


Jane Fundis. President 







157 



IIB$ 




158 



fcUflW 



1. 


Kelly McNeil- 


17. 


Kathy Rand 


32. 


Nancy Herrmann 


47. 


Lisa Lamb 


2. 


Megan Myall 


18. 


Cathy Crook 


33. 


Lori Berry 


48. 


Meg Peterman 


3. 


Stacy Rudin 


19. 


Liz Cattell 


34 


Karen Armstrong 


49. 


Maria Jocobsen 


4. 


Lynda Priest 


20. 


Schyler Koon 


35. 


Lisa Rogers 


50. 


Jaymie Morris 


5. 


Aimee Dousquet 


21. 


Barbara Love 


36. 


Lisa Rojas 


51. 


Kim Power 


6. 


Nancy Goforth 


22. 


Kathleen Knuf 


37. 


Robin Christen 


52. 


Coni Feikes 


7. 


Karen Kosrelyk 


23. 


Mary Shrigley 


38. 


Laurie Hall 


53. 


Rochelle Rose 


8. 


Jammy Jovey 


24. 


Down Cantacessi 


39. 


Suzi Shifely 


54. 


Chris Collier 


9. 


Kathleen Meiners 


25. 


Julie Fisher 


40. 


Julie Hueftle 


55. 


Jill Holderman 


0. 


Julie Kelly 


26. 


Laura Allen 


41. 


Maty Richards 


56. 


Nancy Hull 


1. 


Cindi Davis 


27. 


Pom Ryall 


42. 


Christi Ferraro 


57. 


Susan Uhalde 


2. 


Elisa Pagni 


28. 


Kim Berkshire 


43. 


Brenda Becker 


58. 


Elaine Wallace 


3. 


Karen James 


29. 


Jane Lazovich 


44. 


Nancy Green 


59. 


Candi Jackson 


4. 


Kristin Dalmer 


30. 


Margie Hassett 


45. 


Renee Welles 


60. 


Lisa James 


5. 


Rayleen Capurro 


31. 


Theresa Hinen 


46. 


Kris Nelson 


61. 


Lorraine Furchner 


6. 


Kathy Draxton 
















159 



Pi Beta Phi 




«4 



■ ' / ■ 



\^" ; -^ 



Pi Phis, Fall i960 



MMhtmmtit:* 



ii " !! !! 



it§K ^ 



160 




.' . . 'i, '.V 



Lambda Chi Alpha 




161 




i\ 



— — - v^ ^* 



r f -J*' 









WWWW I * 




AXA 



Lambda Chi Alpha 




162 




1. 


Mike Dovies 


14. 


Chris Compst 


27. 


Michael Kirby 


2. 


Pete Erchort 


15. 


Dill Jorgensen 


28. 


Tony Arenett 


3. 


Pete Jackson 


16. 


Jim Pickering 


29. 


Kurt Herzog 


4. 


Craps Souza 


17. 


Kirk Mortimore 


00. 


Joe Dennett 


5. 


Ryan Tors 


16. 


Steve Rose 


31. 


Dob Calloway 


6. 


Grant Coonley. pres. 


19. 


Ron Rose 


32. 


Mike Mann 


7. 


Christopher Simpson 


20. 


Henry Sotelo 


33. 


Ira Levine 


8. 


Stacy Ettinger 


21. 


Scott Hess 


34. 


Brian Martin 


9. 


Steven Dus 


22. 


Scott Clams 


35. 


Corky Magorian 


10. 


Matt Teizeira 


20. 


Eric Long 


36. 


Richard Moore 


11. 


Mike Rehm 


24. 


Jerry Coles 


37. 


Dean Kasparian 


12. 


Dill Hedges 


25. 


Mark Colbath 


38. 


Jim Whalen 


10. 


Dave Stipech 


26. 


William C. Moore 







163 




$2K 



Phi Sigma Kappa 




164 




1. Rick Rose 

2. Chris Williams 

3. Dob Dugon 

4. Jim Pace 

5. Dove McReynolds 

6. Robert Zill 

7. Brion McCormock 

8. Don Reed 

9. Erik Kronawetter 

10. Marty Crew 

11. Eric Collins 

12. Andrew Junius 

13. Chris Schroeder 

14. Tim Hoselton 



165 



Phi Sigma Kappa 




166 



ill UAH 



Sigma Nu 




67 






SN 



Sigma Nu 



a 




168 




1. 


Neol McClellan 


17. 


Greg Harrington 


2. 


Rich Poore. president 


18. 


Mike Piekarz 


3. 


Sfeve Simon 


19. 


Dob Klosterman 


4. 


Russ the Door 


20. 


Joe Heying 


5. 


Todd Talbot 


21. 


John Carter 


6. 


Gteg Smith 


22. 


Conan Dortl 


7. 


Don the Door 


23. 


John Emetson 


6. 


Doug Harper 


24. 


Tom Dos 


9. 


Marc Forsythe 


25. 


Dave Newcomer 


10. 


Jerry Hopper 


26. 


Ron Deal 


11. 


Ron Basra 


27. 


Cliff Dartl 


12. 


Stewart Handle 


28. 


Rick Hollam 


13. 


Jim Overton 


29. 


Joe Derungs 


14. 


Dob Darney 


30. 


Dave Erickson 


15. 


Tim Casey 


31. 


Ken Fritz 


16. 


Dob Duck 


32. 


Dan Caruso 



33. Tom Steingrapher 

34. Charlie Arciniega 

35. Jeff Pepple 

36. Mike Morrison 

37. Stan Dennett 

38. Mike Grunstead 

39. Mike Hays 

40. Dennis Eckmeyer 

41. Matt Carter 

42. Ron Morris 

43. Dave Melroy 

44. Dave Melroy 

45. Warren Stotler 

46. Gary Hopper 

47. Dick Garrison 

48. Riley 



49. Ryan Haws 

50. Kevin Derry 

51. Jeff Johnson 

52. Sam Jack 

53. Kevin Oxborrow 

54. Ross Rytting 

55. Dob Rice 

56. Jim Mavis 

57. Tim Krump 

58. Dob Rossi 

59. Mottin Darrett 

60. Doug DeAngeli 

61. Pat Wilmoth 

62. Reese Dostwick 

63. Brad Fitch 




169 



ATQ 



Alpha Tau Omega 





170 



' 



M 



1 Doug Howerfon 


16. Tom Lobkowicz 


2. John Camlin 


17. Dill Lanning 


3. John Sansoneo 


18. Mike Daniels 


4. The Dradshaw 


19. Al Strusser 


5. Dob Drown 


20. Mike Mitrani 


6. Nye Smoley 


21. Drion Drokulich 


7. Chris Curtis 


22. John Darton 


8. Steve Metcalf 


23. Scott Knutsen 


9. Drion Rothe 


24. Dob Coleman 


10. Chris McAviney 


25. Kevin Krick 


11. Steve Pecorillo 


26. Dennis Lingenfelter 


12. Eorl Horton 


27. Tom Kay 


13. Paul Stoll 


28. John Dedell 


14. Rolfe Schwartz 


29. Mitch Dailey 


15. Tom NocDiormid 






171 



Alpha Tau Omega 



172 




Phi Delta Theta 







173 



miri 



174 




1. Mike Schulz 

2. John Forrester 
0. John Peck 

4. Steve Doniels 

5. John Warwick 

6. Mike McAuliffe 

7. Joel Modison 

8. Dill Siegel 

9. Steve Wick 
10. Scott Lorkin 

11 Richard Harmon 



12. Clint Fries 

13. Dan Lampshire 

14. Ray Bryan 

15. Jim Latourette 

16. George Ohusn 

17. Allen Eudokimo 

18. John Moser 

19. Lewie Jordan 

20. Russ Dlackburn 

21. Chuck Shembri 

22. Dan Berger 



23. Justin Watson 

24. Scott Kelison 

25. Charles Dannehl 

26. John Moser 

27. Jim Jempso 

28. Mike Bratzler 

29. Pat McQuillian 

30. Teresa Ponton 

31. Dennis White 

32. Debbie Knowles 

33. Candy Crabtree 




175 




176 



1 


Clay Apaletequi 


16. 


Piggy Torvienen 


31. 


Jeff England 


45. 


Kevin Collen 


2. 


Ernie Sullivenf 


17. 


Craig Lemons 


32. 


Mr. Mellow 


46. 


Gary Warren 


3. 


Gory Kuchler 


18. 


Andy Assuras 


33. 


Chuckles Valverde 


47. 


Dave Gray 


4. 


Dove Longfield 


19. 


Dave Harger 


34. 


Whit Craig 


48. 


Mitch Rauh 


5. 


Dove Adams 


20. 


Paul Diflo 


35. 


Burt 


49. 


Sayenara Segura 


6. 


Tim Iveson 


21. 


Beetle Bailey E.A. 


36. 


Doc Bodensteiner 


50. 


Brian Bannister 


7. 


Jack Prescott 


22. 


Wayne Makabe 


37. 


Mr. Potato 


51. 


John Kleppe 


8. 


Jack Glenn 


23. 


Stupid Pill Bill 


38. 


Steve Mestre 


52. 


Ken Pochman 


9. 


Gary Foote 


24. 


Bob Mays 


39. 


Tom Bodensteiner 


53. 


Tom Derunges 


10. 


Tom Johnson 


25. 


Bill Johnson 


40. 


Drake Ferrari 


54. 


Gone 


11. 


Gory Cameron 


26. 


Paul Riccardi 


41. 


Scott Wohl 


55. 


John Faulstich 


12. 


Matt Stock 


27. 


Tom Kerns 


42. 


Brian Fleming 


57. 


Ted Martin 


13. 


High Pin McMullen 


28. 


Pot O'Brien 


43. 


Dennis Galvin 






14. 


Mike Hoy 


29. 


Gory Turner 


44. 


Reudy Townsen 






15. 


Gregory Higgins 


30. 


Wes Nesmifh 












177 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



178 




Omega Xi 




179 



180 




1 Harry Gledhill 


17. Tom Ewold 


2. Druce Hicks 


18. Jack McGinley 


3. Jim Cook 


19. John Torres 


4. A. J. Horon 


20. John Murphy 


5. Don Aubertine 


21. Dave Williams 


6. Rick Burke 


22. Chris O'Brien, pres 


7. Doug Noble 


23. Glen Daily 


8. Kenny Lancaster 


24. Erick Gruener 


9. Jeff Rouse 


25. Dave Lake 


10. Tom Lyons 


26. Tyler Regan 


11. Mitch Williams 


27. Jim Williams 


12. Tony Mahon 


28. Bill Austin 


13. Jack Lyons 


29. Mitch Devalliere 


14. Robin Reeve 


30. Bart Fisher 


15. Tom Ebert 


31. Rodger Lancaster 


16. Matt Woddington 






181 




182 



C Ail 



Lincoln Hall 










183 



Lincoln Hall 




1 Mike "Bandit" Temme 

2. Caly Lowson 

3. Ron Hartwig 

4. Jeff Hancock 

5. Art Andrae 

6. Doongkuk Kum 

7. Dave Gillette 

8. Steve Tuttle 

9. Chris Newell 
10. Robin Joyce 
11 Paul Sarman 

12. Duncan Edwards 

13. Sam Corn 

14. Kurt Hardung 

15. Tom Melancon 

16. Abe L Hall 

17. Eric Jones 

18. Doug Atwood 

19. Dan Luther 

20. Tom Daroch 

21. Brian Aikin 

22. Pete Luthiger 

23. John Greenwood 

24. Bill O'Donnell 

25. Steve Yopps 

26. Mike Edmunds 

27. Tom Kelly 

28. Bill Deming 

29. Dave de los Santos 

30. Steve Knapp 

31. Maude Lynn 

32. Jim Michaelis 

33. Andy "Rowdy" Barrett 

34. John "Ozone" Bronder 

35. Craig "Burnie" Burnside 

36. Mat Metcalfe 

37. Alan Goodman 

38. Don Boucier 

39. Steve Palazzolo 

40. Gary Selmi 

41. Don Giorgi 

42. Andy Jenkins 

43. Paul Yeager 

44. Lynn Kelley 

45. Yiu-Chung Lee 

46. Ken Johnson 

47. Rob Willyard 

48. Dave Thornton 

49. Kelley Lyzenga 



184 




• 




185 



Manzanita Hall 




1. Julie Jarrert 

2. Lisa Bedotto 

3. Cheryl Sarroris 

4. Wendy Doyd 

5. Jon Thran 

6. Joy Allison 

7. Moriso MocNelly 

8. Terri Cloth 

9. Laura Allen 

10. Sheila Smith 

11. Barbara Firth 

12. Debby Hines 

13. Jencie Fagon 

14. Barbara Phillips 

15. Leigh Tweddle 

16. Sue Sokol 

17. Mary Farrell 

18. Linda Lesperance 

19. Irene Armabula 

20. Nolo Pratt 

21. Teri Bassett 

22. Donna Randall 

23. Mary Tate 

24. Mary Sheehy 

25. Melanie Hendricks 

26. John Ann Mendoza 

27. Betsy MacDiarmid 



186 




**\ 




187 



Attn wytfwac*! 
#►**<««* it *«, 



Manzanita Hall 



188 




White Pine Hall 




189 



White Pine Hall 




1. 


Allison Young 


40. 


Holly Shorpe 


2. 


Gail Hellwinkel 


41. 


Linda Dekeuster 


3. 


Lisa Pesclo 


42. 


Lizzy Dorden 


4. 


Mory Jo Wegmonn 


43. 


Shauna Honey 


5. 


Donno Volenti 


44. 


Drent Dowers 


6. 


Condoce Drown 


45. 


William Chivel 


7. 


Carlo Lomb 


46. 


Steve Volk 


8 


Condoce Kendall 


47. 


Tom Drazinski 


9 


Chris Loud 


48. 


Carey Stewart 


10. 


Gory Madonna 


49. 


William Sullivan 


11. 


Trina Kendall 


50. 


Steve Timko 


12. 


Grey Madonna 


51. 


Ken Avonce 


13. 


Peter Costo 


52. 


Steve Durton 


14. 


Laura Frenkel 


53. 


Ted E. Dare 


15. 


Matthew Corley 


54. 


Frances Nye 


16. 


Jeff Hutzler 


55. 


Erwin Rommel 


17. 


Chorlene Hover 


56. 


Richard Cravatt 


18. 


Foye Palmore 


57. 


Marsha Petry 


19. 


Connie Gerling 


58. 


Todd Howard 


20. 


Dernodette Stepney 


59. 


Steve Lambert 


21. 


Elizabeth Funke 


60. 


General Jodyl 


22. 


Larry Dodd 


61. 


Mike Williams 


23. 


Mike Savers 


62. 


Jeff Adams 


24. 


Kelly Drown 


63. 


Steve Foulenfont 


25. 


Joe Edson 


64. 


Tom Leahy 


26. 


Carol Curtis 


65. 


Dennis Wilson 


27. 


Dojo Lemick 


66. 


Forrest Walker 


28. 


Paula Leonard 


67. 


Stephanie Swanson 


29. 


Druce Meneley 


68. 


Ira Levine 


30. 


Leslie Fly 


69. 


Aaron Dygert 


31. 


Mary Lopez 


70. 


Jeff Chlara 


32. 


Renee Funke 


71. 


Joe McDoniel 


33. 


Dernadine Garcia 


72. 


Joe Roto 


34. 


Ellen Yraguen 


73. 


David Wilkenson 


35. 


Kris Peterson 


74. 


Craig Van Sickel 


36. 


Penny Corsentino 


75. 


Paul Klindt 


37. 


Morgeurite Camino 






38. 


Judy Shorpe 






39. 


Laurie Sharpe 








I'M) 




191 



Nye Holl 




192 



1. Marina Forman 

2. Sherry Vance 

3. Jon Wardlaw 

4. Barbara Rickerts 

5. Carlo Gillespie 

6. Lino Munson 

7. Cindy Thompson 

8. Franki Porter 

9. Lisa Laird 

10. Tippy Sandquist 
11 Kris Nelson 

12. Julie Rogers 

13. Alkie Sam 

14. Nancy Eagan 

15. Marty Ralph 

16. Fred the Bird 

17. Jo Bean 

18. Cyndy Sanders 

19. Helen Byrnes 

20. Kurt Loeswick 

21. Bever McCloulott 

22. Phil Keeney 

23. Ken Wright 

24. Perry Brown 

25. Joe Swan 

26. Kinie Stallworth 

27. Brent Solari 

28. Jeonnine Geist 

29. Mark Chandler 

30. Jack Coine 

31. Donna Booth 

32. Tedd Wizard 

33. Robin Bunch 

34. Doug Doyle 

35. Frank Morino 

36. Pete Oskom 

37. Kevin Cronin 

38. Christian Kolberg 

39. Joseph Paoletti 

40. Kirsten Sorgaard 

41. Shaugh Ziech 

42. Cori Bradshaw 

43. Deonna Carlson 

44. John Borgos 

45. Anasthesia Whelan 

46. Mark Morgan 

47. Zoe Aguiar 

48. Patty Wilson 




**'. 



: 4r& A * ' 








>^'%tip* 






* A.* .;-,■' 















\ " 



c*a? 






■ --■■ n 



tfSa 



193 



rinr» 



Nye Hall 



194 




iWSVm 



<f 



Juniper Hall 




195 



Juniper Hall 




1. Joe Phillips 


14. 


Donna Powers 


2. Cindy Hoshem 


15. 


Heidi Walker 


3. Doug Godsby 


16. 


Todd Sprague 


4. Tim Cowman 


17. 


Dale White 


5. Keith Palmer 


18. 


Greg White 


6. Pot Aver 


19. 


Eric Frassato 


7. Richard Hunter 


20. 


Debby Hines 


8. Liana Lianov 


21. 


Tim Zedaker 


9. Karen Kurzynski 


22. 


Norm Huckle 


10. Dave Earle 


23. 


Guy Kuo 


11. Christy Deymer 


24. 


Jeff Porkhurst 


12. Susan Piatt 


25. 


Pete Elletson 


13. Dean Osborne 


26. 


Chris Olack 





196 



rAǤ 



WE'VE 



KNCWN 






ffivf 



Abernathy, Tommy Sr , Sp, Ed 
Augustine, Abia Sr , Chem 
Acree, Jonathan Sr., Journ 
Adams, Brian Jr., Acer. 



Adams, Pamela Fr., Undecl 
Alexander, Pamela Fr., Bus. 
Allen, Laura Fr., Poly Set 
Allison, Joy Fr., SSVC 



Ambler, Allen Fr , Poly Set. 
Ameen, Meer Sr., Acer 
Anerson, Grant Sr., Acer. 
Anderson, llona Fr , Spanish 



Anderson, Jon Sr , Soil So 
Anderson, Poul PhD, Engin 
Anderson, Peter Fr., Info Sysr 
Arden, Teresa Fr , Nurririon 




198 




Austin, Dean Fr , Biology 
Advance, Kenneth Fr , Bus 
Ayala, Raul Sr , Ch.E 
Azizisefot, Soloymon Sr , C E 



Bobb, Al Sr , Biology & Morh 
Bader, Debbie Fr ., Journ 
Boiley, Cynthia So , Theorre 
Bailey, Lisa Sr., Elern Ed 



Baird, Lottaine Fr., Poly So 
Baker, Dave Sr , Mech Engin 
Balch, Bruce Fr., Insurance 
Baldwin, Jacquelin Sr . Home Ec 



Bollinger, Dana Fr , Morh 
Banks, Greg Sr., E.E 
Barclay, Paul Sr , M E 
Bardy, Lisa Fr., Business 



199 



Barnes, Joyce Jr., Ed 
Darone, Ronnie Sr., Nursing 
Barsanti, Linda So., Manag, Sci. 
Barsonti, John Fr., Manag. Sci 



Barta, Lori Fr , Bus. Manag. 
Bartl, Connan So., Voc. Ed, 
Bartletr, Jennifer Fr , Mech, Engin, 
Barton, Amy So,, Business 



Baskerville, Laufa Sr., Poly Sci. 
Baughman, Jerry Fr., Phys. Ed 
Baumsteiger, Kevin So., Manag Sci 
Beam, Lisa Fr,, Psychology 



Bell, Kofhy Fr , Phys Therapy 
Belframini, Joe Sr , Journ 
Bendure, Sue Sr., Manag. Sci. 
Benson, Laurence Sr , Manag Sci. 



200 





Beres, Michael Fr., fW 
Berger. Janet Sr , Biology 
Berger, Stuart Fr,, Econ 
Berry, Kathleen So., Undeclared 



Binger, Beth Fr., Poly Sci 
Bissett, Linda Sr., Social Serv. 
Block, Kathryn So , Pre-Med 
Blondfiels, David Fr., Pre Med 



Blum, Gayle So., Crim Jusrice 
Bodenstelner, Dominic Jr , Pre Med 
Doggess, Letha Fr , Journalism 
Bohn, Cori Fr., Nursing 



Bongers, Nenh Fr , Qv. Engin 
Booth, Donna Sr , Spec. Ed 
Boothroyd, Becky Sr., Accounring 
Bormon, Kerri Jr., Journalism 



201 



I 



ii 



Too many people come to 
school expecting an entertaining 
show. If they don't get it they feel 
cheated, and they conclude that 
they're getting a lousey education. 

But, the quality of education is 
determined much more by 
reflective, intelligent contemplation 
on the part of the student. 

Oscar Wilde said that education is 
an admirable thing, it is well to 
remember that nothing worth 
knowing can be taught. ^ ^ 

CHARLES MORSE 




... TRUmw^ 






202 




Boston, Aric Sr , Civ Eng 
Botelho, Barboro Fr., Phys. Ed 
Towmon, Suzanne So , Nursing 
Bradley. Elizabeth Sr , SSVC 



Brantingham, Laurie Sr., Eng 
Braunsdorf, Eric Fr , Unded. 
Brenner, Steven So., Spanish 
Brink, April So., Botany 



Brinkmeyer, Mike Fr , Unded 
Brockovich, Steve Sr., Finance 
Brown, Andrea Fr., Pharm 
Brown, Scott Fr,, Elec. Engin. 



. ICAOUI 








Brown, Stephanie Sr , Poly Sa 
Brown, Susan So., Bus Adm 
Brumley, John Fr., Bus Manog 
Buffington, Judy So., Ag. P,ec. 



203 



Bulkeley, Laurie So., Ag. 


Bunch 


Robin So 


, Journalism 


Burke, 


Susan Sr., 


Nursing 


Burns, 


Laura Fr., 


Undeclared 



Burns, Laurie Fr., Undeclared 
Buttner, Misty Fr , Elem. Ed 
Buzick, Patty Fr., Bus Adm 
Byrnes, Helen Jr , SSVC 



Bzoskie, Jeffrey Fr ., Undecl 
Cocciatore, Jim Fr., Acer 
Caine, Jack Fr , Chemisrry 
Callahan, Deborah Jr , Acer 



Calloway, Robert So., ME 
Campbell, Mike Fr , Manog Sci 
Cangemi, Joanne Sr., Elem Ed. 
Caramella, Jennifer Fr , Undecl 



A)A 




a 



I'm voting for Reagan. 

I'm really getting tired of Carter 
and his really do-nothing policies. 
He hopes that everything will just 
go away. I think it's time to do 
something. 

I like some of the ideas that 
Reagan's getting accross but I 
don't like Reagan personally. I 
like his ideas about surrounding 
himself with a lot of good minds, 
and Carter hasn't and I think he's 
already proved that. 

I don't like Carter's policies so 
far. It's not getting anything 
accomplished and it's wasting our 
time and his. 

I don't know about Anderson. 
What I've learned is from 
Doonesbury. I really feel he 
doesn't have a chance. V V 

PETE TUTTLE 




205 



Carlson, Deanna So , Journalism 
Carlson, Robert Jr , Engin. 
Cornell, Lynn Fr., Accounring 
Corrigon, James So., Med Tech. 



Caruso, Michelle Fr., Accounring 
Caselli, John Fr , Undeclared 
Casey, Timothy So , Bee Engin. 
Casey, Tom Fr., Undecided 



Cattell, Chris So , Mech Engin. 
Covenaugh, Lori So., Educorion 
Chambers, Cloudia Jr , El, Ed 
Chambers, Michael Sr , Geophysics 



Chapman, Bruce Sr., Mech Engin 
Chhino, Ivor Fr , Undeclared 
Christie, Owen Sr , Marketing 
Churn, Laura Fr , Undeclared 



20b 




the main reason I came here is because I was bored at where I used to go to school, 

in Denver, Colo. I had some roommates and friends here." 

It's hard to get into an Iranian university because you have to have the equivalent to 

what's a 3.8 average over here. 

"I'm going to be a civil engineer. Next semester I'll be a senior. Then I'll probably go 

for my master's. 

The only thing I can say (about the Iran and Iraq war) is that I hope it just gets over. 

Everyone is tired of it. 

Everybody was calling from home to say that it is just exaggeration - that they're telling 

you, . . . what they're giving you back here is the media and nothing else. It's just quiet. 

There is war but not with that intensity that they show over here. 

If there are no other countries besides Iran, Iraq, then I think there should be no others. 
I'm glad they're (the hostages) pretty close to being released. It's really satisfactory 

now, and they call us from home and everybody is just tired of it. They're bored of what's 

going on over there. 
They just want them 
home. 

Supposedly, the 
people are the ones 
who are the ones who 
build up our 
government. But, at the 
time being . . . just the 
minority of people, who 
are hardline in Moslem 
fundamentals, those are 
the ones that are being 
really hard on the 
United States. I hope 
they're released as soon 
as possible. This can't go 
on. We've been having 
a terrible time ever 
since those hostages 
were seized. 

I don't think I'll be 
able to work here after I 
graduate. The 
immigration point of 
view . . . from this 
situation ... is that 
they're not issuing any 
permits for jobs for 
foreigners, especially 
Iranians. 

RASOUL D. HADIGHEH 




ti 




207 



Clark. Sandra Fr . Undecl 
Clifford. Charlotte Sr An Sci 
Colbert, Michelle So , Medicine 
Collett, Joann Sr.. Off Adm 



Collier, Chris Sr . Med Tech 
Collier, Matthew Fr . Engin. 
Collins. Cary Fr , Pre Med 
Considine, John So , Dec. Engin 



Cook. James Fr , Morkering 
Cooksey. Barbara Fr Texriles 
Coonley, Lillian Sr.. Manag Sci. 
Cooper, Linda So , Htsrory 



Corsentino, Penny Fr , Manag 
Cost, Deborah So , Business 
Couron. Lisa Sr , Nursing 
Cox, Mike Fr , Bus Adm 




208 




Crew, Martin Jr , Civ Engm 
Crews, Marsha Sr , So. Parh. 
Crosswhite, Gary Fr ., Recreation 
Cullen, Kevin Fr., Poly 5a 



Cunningham, Craig Fr , Business 
Curry, Daniel So., Geo Engin. 
Curry, Rosa Fr., Business 
Cury, Julie Sr , Spec Ed. 



Dahl, Michael Fr , Cnm Justice 
Darrough, James Sr., Manag S;i 
Davidson, William Jr., Accounring 
Dovies, Michael So., Info Sysrems 



Davis, Cindi Fr., Poly Sci 
Davis, Diane So., Journalism 
Davis, Michael Fr , Undeclared 
Deaver, Jimi Fr., Undeclared 



209 



Deem, Cor. Jr , Med. Tech. 
Dehne, Mischelle So., Child Dev 
Dekeuster, Linda So , Undeclared 
Dibifonto, Debbie Sr , Elem Ed 



Dickson, Wendy So., Dus Adm 
Dieckmann, John Fr., English 
DiLonardo, Kimberly Fr., Unded. 
Dioguardi, Michelle Sr., Sot. Serv. 



Dolon, Joseph Fr , Forestry 
Dover, Den Jr , Ag. Engin. 
Doyle, Judith So ., Undeclared 
Drake, John So., Accounting 



Driscoll, Diane Sr., Med Tech 
Droutsas, Alexandra So , Poly Sci. 
Drury, Diann Fr , Animal Sci. 
Duffrin, Brian Fr , Accounting 



210 




,'■.'' 




Dunfield, Terry Sr , Ag Ed 
Duxbury, Jennifer So , Business 
Eogon, Nancy So , Accounting 
Eckmeyer, Dennis So , Agriculture 



Edgington, Ruedy Sr , Civil Engin 
Einstoss, Robby Jr , Fash Merch 
Ellcegui, Mark Fr., Civil Engin. 
Elmshaeuser, Loretto Fr,, Joum 



Elston, Mark Sr , Accounring 
Elwood, Liz So., Ag Ed 
Emerson, Judy So., Undeclared 
Emerson, Stephanie So,, Nursing 



Emerson, Susan Jr., Elem. Ed. 
Ennes, Julie Fr , Pre-Denrol 
Enright, Jeri Fr , Poly Set 
Erichson, Karen Fr , Undeclared 



211 



'Wk 



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. . . Education here is a lot better because we 
have a smaller school ond we can get closer 
contact with the professors and also with the 
students around us, especially in the college 
I'm in - engineering. 

I get to know a lot of people in engineering 
a lot better than if I were in a big school like 
UCLA. 

The quality of some of the teachers isn't 
quite as good as it could be, but good points 
are that it is a small school and you can get 
personalized contact. You can learn things 
better that way. 

I think the bad points are being improved all 
of the time. It's getting better and better each 
year. I know that the engineering school is 
trying to get better. 

I think the job market will be good, 
especially in the engineering field. From what 
I've heard there are a lot of jobs. v v 

GREG CORSSMAN 






212 





Ericson, Heidi Fr , Accounting 
Eskenazy, David Fr . Bus Adm. 
Ettinger, Stacy Fr , Com. Just 
Evans, Thomas Fr , Engin 



Evans, Vicki Fr., Psychology 
Eveott, Julie Fr ., Spec Ed 
Faver, Catherine Fr., Spec. Ed 
Fagan, Jencie Fr., Med. Set. 



Fahringer, Tim Fr., Bus Adm. 
Falkenberg, David Fr., Undeclared 
Farahani, Akbor Sr , Civil Engin 
Fario, Mary Jo Jr., SSVC 



Farrell, Mary Fr., Elem. Ed 
Faust, Jennifer, So, Ver Sci. 
Fay, Robert Fr., Geo Engin 
Feltner, Susan So , Spanish 



213 



ABfcC 



Fenczik, Denise So , Psychology 
Filer, Glenn Sr., Arr 
Fitz-Gerald, Ashby Fr,, E.E 
Flores, Rose Jr , Theatre 



Flynn, Thomas So , Pre-Med 
Ford, James Fr , Min Engin 
Foreman, Debra Sr , Journalism 
Foster, R. Eric So., Journalism 



Frade, Donald Fr., Farm Manag 
Fraser, Teri Fr , Pre-Denral 
Frossato, Eric Fr., Journalism 
Fredianelli, Melissa Sr., Spec Ed. 



Freeman, Beverly Fr,, Med Tech 
Freese, Patricia Jr , Fash Merch. 
Freitos, Richard Fr , Civil Engin. 
Frenkel, Laura Fr , Engineering 




214 




Friedrichsen, Mitch Sr . Eiem. Ed. 
Fries, Sherri Jr., Journolism 
Fronek. Croig Fr.. Undedored 
Frow, Maria Fr , Journolism 



Fry, Mary Sr., English 
Fry, Robert Fr , Mech Engin. 
Frybarger, Sandra Fr., Animal Sci 
Fudd, Elmo So , Engineering 



Fuller, Gary Sr , Monog. So 
Fundis, Jane Sr , Journalism 
Gadou, Georges Sr , Geo. Engin. 
Galvin, John Sr., Business 



Gansert, Guy Sr., Zoology 
Garcia, Bernadine Fr , Business 
Garcia, Maria Sr., Biology 
Garcia, Tod Fr , Arch Eng 



215 



Gardner, Kirk Sr., Journalism 
Garrett, Winnie Fr , Pre Ver 
Gartman, John Sr. , Marketing 
Gaub, Christopher Jr., Dus Adm 



Geis, Nancy Fr., Undeclared 
Gennett, Paul Jr., Geo Engin. 
George, Nora Sr , Comm. Serv. 
Givani, Lori Sr , Spec Ed 



Goble, Cheri Jr., Journalism 
Gonzales, John Fr,, Poly Sci, 
Gonzales, Mitchell Fr., Dus Adm. 
Gonzales, Sonja Fr., Bus Adm. 



Gorham, Patricio Sr , Arr 
Gould, Pam So., Undeclared 
Graham, Steve Sr , Educanon 
Gray, Susie Jr , Nursing 







216 




Green, Charles Sr , Accounting 
-Grenade, Gail So , Poly 5ci. 
Griffin, Zoe Fr , Office Adm 
Grim, Paul Sr., Geology 



Gurr, Keri Fr , Bus Adm 
Guterrez, Mark So., Architecture 
Hadigheh, Rasoul Jr., CM Eng 
Hadley, Anne Sr , History 



Hager, Charlene So , Geology 
Hail, Gordon Sr , Mining Engin. 
Hall. Linda Jr , Speech Comm 
Hambidge, Margaret Fr , Undecl 



Hombleton, Deboroh Sr , English 
Hamilton, Chris Fr , Horel Adm 
Hamma, William Jr., Poly Sd 
Hammil, Dihan Fr ., Journalism 



217 



/Ill 



Hompfon, Gregory Fr., Engin, 
Handley, Don So., Journalism 
Hansen, Michael Sr., Music Ed 
Hanzek, Mike Fr , Undeclared 



Harasymchuk, Linda Sr , Prelaw 
Harney, Kimberly Fr., Pre-Med 
Hart, James Jr , Civil Engin 
Hastings, Marnee Fr , Spec Ed 




Hasty, Carl Sr., PSV 
Hatttup, Datbara Fr , Business 
Hoyden, Down So., Elem, Ed 
Hayes, Aaton Fr , Bus. & Psy 



Hazley, Kelly So., Dus Manag 
Heckethorn, Sharon Sr., Nursing 
Hellwinkel, Gail So., El Ed 
Hendricks, Melanie Jr , Pre Med 






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... I was ready to make a change, a job 
change, and I was divorced after 25 years. I 
had been home; a housewife and mother for a 
period of 20 years. 

I'm getting a masters' in Counceling and 
Guidance. 

1 had a bachelor's in Art. Years ago, before I 
was married, I had the equivalent of an 
associate's degree in retailing. 

I worked in retailing three years. My 
husband made that decision to be a housewife 
for me. Well, I agreed to it at that time. I had 
three daughters. 

When I came back to school, I had two kids 
on campus, so they thought that was funny. 

Because I work forty hours a week I 
sometimes feel like I'm on a treadmill of going 
to work, going to classes, going home doing 
homework, doing housework, and there's not 
much time for anything else. 

Students are receptive of people coming 
back. Because I got my bachelor's seven years 
ago and so I've been in classes with young 
people for a long time. 

Most professors are my age. 



U 



GEORGIA WESTBROOK 





219 



Henslee. Rhondo Fr , Child Psy 
Herrington, Michael Sr., Man Sci 
Hersrud, Shawn Fr., Accounring 
Hertz, Haley Fr., Undeclared 



Hill, George Fr , Biology 
Hinen, Theresa Jr., Economics 
Hinsey, Brian Sr , Merol Engin. 
Holliefield, Barry Fr , Unded. 



Holmes, Gay So., Psychology 
Holmes, iami So , Accounring 
Holmes, William Sr , Pre-Denrol 
Hooper. Lovie Sr., Social Serv 



Horan, Christine Fr,, Unded. 
Horan, Ed Sr ., Ind Ed 
Howard, Todd So,, Journalism 
Hoy, David So., Accounring 




,vi > 



/* 




Hughes, Lance Fr . RNR 
Hull, Nancy Sr , Manog Sci 
Humphrey, Peggy Fr , Bern Ed 
Hunt, Patty Sr., Acer 



Hurin, Alex Jr , Phys Ed 
Hutchens, Eric Fr., Elec Eng 
Ingersoll, Lorraine Sr., SSVC 
Irani, Susan Fr , Undeclared 



Jackson, Candice Sr , Home Ec 
Jackson, James So , Undeclared 
Jackson, Kimberly Fr., Accounring 
Jackson, Laurel Sr., Journ 6 Poly Sci. 



Jacques. Mary Sr., Accounring 
Jenks, Roger Fr., Mech Eng 
Jerich, Pete So , Criminal Jusr. 
Joanette, Judi Fr , Nursing 



JL\ 



221 



4*JR 



Joelson, Geri So , Inr, Affairs 
Joelson, Irene Fr., Undecl. 
Johnson, Mary Sr , English 
Johnston, Frederick So , Arr 



Johnston, Steve Fr , Undecl 
Jones, Jacqueline Fr., Acer 
Jones, Michelle Sr , Elem Ed 
Jones, Vicky Sr , Home Ec. 



Jones, Yvonne Jr , SSVC 
Jorgensen, Dill So , Chemistry 
Joyce. Robin Jr., Journalism 
Jozwiak, Liana Fr , Arr 



Kandison, Ogbesia Fr., Undecl 
Kanellow, Angelo Jr , Range Manag. 
Kaplan, Nicol Fr , Verinary Med. 
Kareck, Katherine Fr , Marh 



.'.'.' 





Korleo. David So , Beer Engm 
Katz, Nancy So , Business 
Kearney, Dobby Sr , Med Set. 
Kelly, Patti Sr , Nursing 



Kendall, Candace Fr , linden 1 
Kendall, Christina So , Educarion 
Kent, Rimo Sr , Geography 
Khalsa, Kirtan Sr , Undeclared 



Kilcollins, Kimmie So., 5SVC 
Chon, Kim Fr , Inrenor Ciesign 
Kimm, Daniel Fr., Pre-Phormocy 
Klindt, Paul Sr., Sec Ed 



Klosterman, Robert Sr , Geology 
Knapp, Stephen Sr., Music 
Knorpp, Scott Jr. , Biology 
Knox, Lianne Fr., Ver Sci 



Knuf, Kathleen Fr., Undecl. 
Knutzen, Karen Fr , Dusiness 
Koch, Sherrie Fr. , Agriculture 
Koehler, Yvonne Jr., Elem. Ed 



Kompst, Chris Jr., English 
Korcheck, Kevin So , Undecl. 
Korcheck, Steven Sr ., Dusiness 
Krai, Scott Fr., fXNR, 



Krommer, Martin Fr., Mer Engin 
Kreisler, Kevin Jr , Pre Med 
Krivel, Mark Sr , Accounting 
Krmpotic, Stephanie So . Psych 



Kuntze, Elizabeth So., Spec. Ed. 
Kuo, Guy Fr , Pre Med 
Laakso, Jerry Fr., Undecl 
Labuda, Joe So ., Journalism 




224 



a 



I think that a lot of current 
activities of the government have 
somewhat tainted the American ideals 
toward the military. 

I think ROTC definitely has a spot in 
terms of the rational of the university 
in training people and preparing them 
for leadership. ROTC does that and the 
marketability of a ROTC student after 
military service is much higher . . . 
and he's achieved a level above his 
peers in the responsibility that's given 
to him. 

I think that our isolation, in terms of 
a nation, has caused us to become a 
little bit more callased to the needs of 
the national community. 

I see things rapidly changing now. 
Awareness is shifting toward the fact 
that the military is needed and it's 
necessary. There are forces in other 
countries which pose threats to us. 
We're no longer the all-knowing, all- 
powerful country. 

CHRIS VOLK 




225 



Lackey, Lori Fr , Psychology 
Lokey, Rodger Jr., Elec. Engin. 
Lambert, Steve So., Physics 
Londolt, David Sr , Ag, Educ 



Lansbery, Linda Sr., SSVC 
Laporte, Cafhleen Fr., Business 
Larson, Jacqueting So., Spec. Ed. 
Larson, Stephanie So., Unded 



Lovin, Antonio Sr., Geology 
Lawrence, Gina Fr , Unded 
Lawson, Floyd Jr., Marketing 
Loyton, Margaret Sr., English 



Leoch, Anno Marie So., Dusiness 
Leono, Edgar Sr , Phys. Ed 
Leary, Theresa Fr , Educarion 
Leavitt, Cindy Jr., Education 



226 




* 




Leavett, Deborah So., Marti 
Lebeouf, Sue So., Undeclared 
Ledbefter, Donno So., Unded. 
Lehnherr. David Sr , Pre Med 



Leigh, Michael Fr ., Chem Engin. 
Lesher, Kathy So , Spec Ed. 
Lester, Linda Fr., Arr 
Levari, Rose Anne So., Marketing 



Levin, Ellice Sr., Elem. Ed 
Levine, Ira Jr., Accounting 
Lewis, Jeffrey Sr., Physics 
Lianov, Liana Sr., Pre Med 



Lienert, Jon Fr., Unded 
Lin, Sue-Jean Sr , Accounting 
Lindsay, Virginia Fr., Nursing 
Lippold, Kelly So., Journalism 



227 



M 



Loeswick, Kurt Fr., Elec. Engin. 
Loffswold, Eric So ., Biology 
Lomison, Linda Sr,, Nursing 
Long, Chris Jr., Comp Sci 



Long, Michael So , Journalism 
Long, Vickie Sr , Cnm. Jusr 
Loop, Deborah Jr., Manag Sci. 
Lopez, Gilbert Jr., Hisrory 



Lubbers, Ingrid Jr , Nursing 
Lyons, Colleen Sr., Pre Med 
Macaulay, Laurie Sr , English 
MacDiarmid, Betsy Fr , Nursing 



MacNelly, Marisa Sr., Pre Med 
Madonna, Gary Fr , Undec. 
Madonna, Greg Jr., English 
Madura, Sandy Jr , French 







228 



* 




Mohan. 


John Fr , 


Account. 


Mahaad 


, Rebecca Sr , Nursing 


Maker, 


} enny Sr 


Nurririon 


Mallery 


David Sr 


, E.E 



Manchester, Alison Fr., Eng. 
Mann, Robert Sr., Bus Adm. 
Mark, Joseph Fr., Bus Adm. 
Marlow, Larry Fr., Per. Adm. 



Marsh, Don Fr., Journalism 
Marston, Kathleen Sr., Warer Set 
Martin, Brian So., Monag. Sri 
Martin, Robert Sr., Bus Monag. 



Martinat, Mary Sr., Nursing 
Martinson, Lisa Fr., Undecl. 
Masegian, Cindy Fr., Phys. Ther 
Mason, Kathy So., Elem Ed 



229 



<* 



I've really just started this semester but 
like it. It's great! In my department, AA, 
they've been just wonderful. I like it. 



I think UNR's great. It's good to be in a small 
school. I went to Long Beach State and it had 
30,000 students. Everything you did was such a 
major ordeal. Here the library people are so 
helpful. 

I'm not wild about Reno. I live in Tahoe and I 
commute. I've lived in Tahoe eight years. 11 

DARLENE WILKERSON 





230 




p 






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Mossochi, Farhad Sr., Civ Engin. 
Massey, Gail Fr., Nursing 
Mossie, Caroll Sr , Music & Arr 
Moter, Jean Fr., Aero. Engin. 



Mathews, Carol Jr., Spanish 
May, Diane So., Bus Adm. 
Mays, Robert Sr., Pre Denral 
Mazzola, Andrea So , Pre-Ver. 



McBride, Darren So, EE 
McCulley, Chris Sr., Spec Ed 
McCulloch, Kerri So , Unded. 
McCulloch, Krtsten Sr., Med. Sa 



McCurry, Stephen Fr., Pre-Med 
McDaniel, Lyndale Sr., Ed 
McDowell, Clifford Fr , El Tech 

McGann, Joe Fr., Elec. Engin. 



231 



rasH 



McGough, Richard So., Journ. 
McKebben, Kip Fr., Acer. 
McMullen, Helen Sr ., SSVC 
McQueen. Patricio Sr., Ed 



McQuillan, Patrick So., Journ. 
McRae, Roger Sr., Geology 
Megan. Sheila Sr . Psychology 
Melancin, Thomas Jr , Dus Adm 



Mendiola, Dori Sr , Acer 
Mendive, Steven Sr., Hisrory 
Mendoza, John Ann Jr., Home Ec 
Meneley, Bruce Jr., Pre Med 



Meoff, Jack Sr , Economics 
Merrill, Deborah Fr , Dusiness 
Merritt, Charlene Fr , Acer 
Meyer, Sharon Sr , Spec Ed 



232 




nJfiUS 




Meyers. Dionne So , Pre Ver 
Michoelis, Jim So , Elec Engm 
Michel, Beotrice Sr , Music 
Michelini, Linda Jr , Nursing 



Middlebrooks, James Fr., Engin. 
Miller. Stephanie Jr., fW 
Miller, Wendi Fr , Bus. Ed 
Mirenda, Robert So , Music 



Moen, Patricia Fr , Biology 
Mohammad!, Atefeh Fr ., Pre Denrol 
Molder, Tracy Sr , Sp. Comm 
Moltart, Marianne Jr , Nursing 



Molyneux, Helen Fr., Dus Adm 
Moore, Lawney Fr., Fashion Merch. 
Morgan, Michelle Fr., Accounting 
Morgan, Shawn So., Nutrition 



233 



Morin, Rene© So., Music 
Morris, Torrey Fr., Manag. Sci. 
Morrison, Kimmer Sr,, Nursing 
Morrison, Mike Fr., Unded. 



Morrow, Beth Jr., fW 
Mortimore, Jill So , Undeci, 
Mortimore, Scoff Jr., Adv. 
Martini, Cynthio So., Spanish 



Motf, Mercy Sr., Nursing 
Moulfon, Mike Fr., Etec Engin. 
Mulkey, Virginio Fr., Bern. Ed. 
Munfz, Georgene Sr,, Bus. Ed. 



Muredo, Susan Sr., Sec. Ed. 
Nash, Barbara Fr., Geology 
Neolis, Craig Sr., Crim. Jusr. 
Nelson, Krisfen Fr., Acer 



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.. • . . i 




Nelson, Peggy Sr , Bus. Ed. 
Nelson, Robert Sr , Pre Med 
Newman, John Sr., Marh 
Newmon, Koryl Fr ., Chern Engin 



Newpher, Jamie Sr., Marketing 
Nguyen, Tammy Fr , Undeclared 
Noori, Parviz Sr., Civil Engin. 
Nunez, Linda Fr., Education 



Obah, Teresa Sr., Sec Arr Ed 
O'Dryan, Patrick So., Elec. Engin 
ODryan, Shannon Fr., Engin. 
Ogundimu, James Sr., Accounring 



Olguin, Druce Jr., Crim Jusr 
Olivos, Lisa Sr., Fashion Merch. 
Olmsteod, Toni Sr., Phys Ed 
Olsen, Karen Jr., Journalism 



23S 



am 



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I think UNR's q good school. I 
think it's getting a lot better. They 
improve it every year. 



They're changing the teachers in 
my department and it's getting 
better all the time. 

I've lived in Reno twelve years. 
When I started school I didn't know 
what I wanted to major in, or take. 




There's a lot of teachers with tenure 
that have a lot to say. They make 
a lot of rules that aren't fair. 

The Associated Students of the 
University of Nevada are good. 
ASUN should have more control. 
There's a lot of inner conflict in 
ASUN, and that's no good. 



»» 



LISA FOSTER 



,' 11, 




Olson, Vicki Fr , Bus Adm. 
Onyeogboko, Agnes Sr , Art Sci 
Orcutt, Carrie Jr , Nursing 
Overstreet, Gerold Sr , Bus. 



Owens, Michael Sr., Bus. Manag, 
Oxborrow, Kevin Sr., Management 
Oxoby, Richard Sr ., Journalism 
Pagni, Elisa Fr., Unded. 



Pahl, Larry Fr., Unded. 
Pakoaman-lahisi, Hossein Sr , C.E. 
Poolefti, Joseph Fr., Elec. Eng 
Park, Karen Fr., English 



Pastorino, Eric Jr., Civil Engin. 
Patterson, Barbara Sr., Sp Parh. 
Paulson, Kim Fr., Bus. Adm. 
Pawliszyn, Alicjo Sr., Med Tech 



237 



Payne, Suzefte Fr , Elem. Ed. 
Pearson, Pamela So., Spec Ed 
Pennington, Cae So , Info Sys. 
Person, Krista Fr., Poly Set 



Peterson, Clint Fr., Dec Eng. 
Peterson, Kris Fr., Bus Manag 
Phon, Que-Huong Sr., Heolrh Ed. 
Lon. Phelps Jr., Civil Engin 



Phillips, Anita Fr., Pre Ver 
Phillips, Barbara Fr , Bus Adm. 
Phillips. Gregory Sr . Chem 
Pierce, Peggy Fr . Archirecrure 



Pierpoint, Rob Fr., Undecl 
Pinard, Dana Jr., Acer 
Piatt, Susan Fr., Chem. Engin 
Podell, Andrea Sr., Spec. Ed. 



238 





Pointon, Martin Jr., Biology 
Poore. Stephen Sr., Pre Med 
Port, Bradley Jr., Educofion 
Posey, Brian So., Pre Low 



Powers, Donna Fr., Bus. Adm. 
Pratt, Nolo Fr., Undecl. 
Prosser, James Jr., Nursing 
Quodrio, Colleen Fr, Journ. 



Quagliona, Tricia Jr., SSVC 
Quenemoen, Terrie Fr., Theorre 
Quinlan, Paul So., Crim. Jusr. 
Radcliffe. Michael So., Music 



Rand, Kathleen Fr., Crim Jusr 
Randall, Donna Fr , Pre Ver 
Ray, Jeff Fr., Business 
Recasens, Alina Fr., Engtn. 



239 



Reeves, Kevin Jr., Poly 


Sci 


Regan, Tyler Sr , Advertising 


Rehimtoola, Shahid Fr,, 


EE. 


Reid, Lisa Fr , Elem, Ed. 




Rentnelli. Mike So , E.E 




Revele, Kathryn Fr , Bt 


is. Adm 


Reynoso, Silvio Fr., Pre 


Med 


Richardson, Carolyn Fr 


Journ. 



Ricketts, Beverly Sr., SSVC 
Ring, Robert III Fr , Psy 
Rizzo, Dion© Fr., Morn Ed 
Rooch, Dole ir , Bus. Ed 



Robbers, Trace So , Journ 
Roberts, Margaret Fr., Inr Des 
Rodela, Adrienne Fr., Unded. 
Rodriguez, Philip Fr , Mkt 




240 



■'* 



c< 



'd like to be a lawyer I guess; try to 
get into some public service work. 

I think education at UNR is pretty good. 
UNR has a good program, where if people 
would apply themselves a lot they can 
excel and come out with a pretty good 
looking resume. Whereas, if a person went 
to a really big name school, they might 
not graduate with good lookin' stuff. 

As for MX, the idea of the mobile missile 
system is good. The idea as a deterrent is 
good. But, the basing mode is bad, and 
where I'm from (Ely, Nevada) is right in 
the center of where they want to put it. 

It's mostly brush and stuff out there, but 
still would destroy the whole place. The 
real crucial thing is that right at the very 
last minute, just before the thing is ready, 
the Soviet's know that once it's ready we 
can blow them off the earth. So, they can 
have a real incentive right then to attack 
us before it's ready. Too many people 
think it's inevitable. They think that Big 
Daddy Government wants it here and it's 
going to come no matter what. That's the 
most wrong thing there is about it. The sea 
mode is really good. There's not too many 
arguments against that. The reason the 
people say, "Why aren't they putting 
them at sea,'' Well it's because the 
government has said, 'Well we want it on 
land.' People haven't said anything. We're 
going to stop it. *• 

STEVE DOBRESCU 




241 



Rodgers, Julie Fr., Marketing 
Rogers, Julie So., Monag. Sci 
Rogers, Lisa Fr., Undeclared 
Rojas, Lisa Fr., Pre-Med 



Romelli, Tamela Sr., Accoun. 
Romeo, Katie Fr., Pre-Denral 
Rose, Steve Fr,, Business 
Ross, Rian Fr., Bus, Adm. 



Rowe, Joson Fr., Mech Engirt. 
Ruby, Trisha Fr., Mech Engin. 
Runnells, Todd Fr., RNR 
Soferite, Kelly So., English 



Said, Greg Fr., Marh 
Salter, Susan Sr., Monag. Sci. 
Sanders, Audrey Fr , Psy 
Sands, Claudia Jr., Biology 











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242 




Sangolis, Rebecca So., Bus 
Santor. Colleen Sr ., Cnm Jusr 
Sasek, Mary Sr , Nursing 
Softerlee, Brad Fr., Bus Monoc 



Saunders, Robert Fr., Undecl 
Scalise, Jayne Sr , Nursing 
Schaefer, Jean Sr., SSVC 
Schechfer, Mary Sr., Nurr 



Scherrer, Trevor Fr , Pre-Med 
Schoen, Kirk So., Elecr Engin 
Seevers, Deborah Fr., Acer. 
Segura, Rick Fr., Undecl 



Sekiguchi, Diane Jr , Med. Ed. 
Sexton, Terri So , Educorion 
Shahnam, Hamid So, EE 
Sharp, Melissa Jr , Eiem Ed 



243 



Sheehy, Richard Sr , Nursing 
Shields, Donna Fr., Psych 
Shirley, Dianne So., Hisrory 
Short, Krisren Sr., Heolrh Ed. 



Sibella, Anthony So., Ph. The. 
Sibella, Scott Fr., Unded. 
Silvo, Nancy Sr., Prelaw 
Simpson, Frindia Sr., Spec Ed 



Simpson, Kathleen So , Cr. Jusr. 
Smith, Jill So , Nursing 
Smith, Shiela Ft, Nursing 
Smith, Teresa Fr,. Marh 



Solaegui, Irene Fr., Unded. 
Solomon, Joy AFSr., Sp. Path. 
Spargo, John Fr., Engin. 
Speer, Julie Fr , Pre Ver 



244 




«t 



<< 



Well, I've thought a lot about 
voting for Reagan. I don't think 
I'm as well informed as I could 
be. 









I don't think Reagan can do 
everything he says he can, just 
as I don't think that every 
presidential candidate can. But, 
with the conservative attitude 
that he has, I know that any bill 
that's presented to him . . . that's 
the attitude he'll have toward it. 

I was in support for President 
Carter for about the first six 
months of the Iran crisis, and then 
after that started getting along, I 
started seeing that the man didn't 
have anything to offer. He didn't 
have any alternatives. Really. So, 
I started seeing that he was 
weak. 

It's more like I'm not voting so 
much for Reagan, as much as I'm 
voting against Carter. 

He's (Carter) been decent. He 
hasn't been corrupt. He's decent. I 
think he's been weak, but he's 
decent. 

I don't know anything about John 
Anderson. I honestly don't know 
anything about him, other than 
he's for federal funding of 
abortion, and I'm really against 
that. " 



MARIANNE MOLLART 



245 



Spencer, Harry Sr., Mech Eng 
Stanbrough, Robert Sr., Acer 
Stosenko, Sonja Fr,, Nurri 
Stearns, Kathleen Sr , Med. Teh 



Sfoltz, Cindy Jr., RM\ 
Stott, Corinne Sr., Acer 
Stowell, Susan Sr , Theatre 
Streshley, Lee jr., Acer 



Sullivent, Ernie Sr , Pre Med 
Swanson, Stephanie So , Die 
Swartz, Patricia Fr., Hisr. 
Talamo, Lisa Sr., SSVC 



Tappero, Terese Fr., Acer 
Tarin, Gilbert Sr , Bus Adm. 
Taylor, Clifford Sr , An Sci. 
Taylor, Opie Fr ., Unded. 



246 




* 











_ 




Wf .--* 


v-^l 






♦ 


41 







Teizeiro, Mofthew Jr , Bus 
Tekoya, Mohamed Sr , Psych. 
Terry, Ernest Sr , Ph. Ed. 
Thornton, David Jr , Pre Med 



Thran, Jan Fr., Bus. Adrn. 
Timmons, Bill Fr., Engin. 
Toth, Paul So., Pre Med 
Triplett, Kirk Fr., Geo Engin. 



Trueba, Anela Sr,, Publ. Rel. 
Trujillo, Rebecca Fr., Bus Adm 
Turk, Mike So., Pre-Law 
Turner, Christina Sr , Mus. Ed 



Turtle, John Fr., Undec! 
Twedt, Jeff Fr., Unded 
Tyler, Stephanie So., Poly Sti 
Uccelli, Cathy Sr., SSVC 



Ifc.I i i if s 



247 



Ueckert, Edwin Sr., Cr Jusr 
Ugolde, Vivian© Fr , Biology 
Uhalde, Susan Sr., Med. Tech. 
Uptain, Lisa Fr ., Acer 



Vaden, Duane Jr., Chem Engia 
Valentine. Holly Fr., Music 
Valleschin, Greg Sr , Pre-Med 
Valtierra, Tony Sr , Soc. 



Vance. Sherry So., Med Tech. 
VanSickel, Craig Sr., Ph. Ed 
Vosquez, Harvey Fr., Poly Sci 
Vereschagin, Craig Sr., CE 



Vicari, Jeani Sr , Chemisrry 
Vonderhaar, Nancy Sr. r CE 
Von Gortler, Hans Sr , EET 
Walcom, Christl Jr., Ed 



248 





tt 



From what I've seen, I'd soy you get o 
satisfactory education. 

Education would probably be improved by 
allotting a little bit more money to the 
facilities in general, possibly purchasing more 
parking spaces, and just things that would 
make it easier to go to school. 

Originally I started out as a criminal justice 
major. I was in Colorado and the best 
criminal justice college this side of the 
Mississippi is here, and so I came here. Then 
I discovered that I couldn't live the way I 
wanted to on the salary of a policeman, and 
so I decided to go into business. 

I like the diversity of the people here. 
There's people from all over the United 
States and all over the world. I like the 
friendly atmosphere,- things like that. " 

DOB SCHIFFMACHER 



249 



Walen, Lisa So , Manag. Sci. 
Walker, Donald Sr , Arr 
Walker. Heidi Jr , Psych 
Walsh. Charlie Fr., Undecl. 



Walsh, Frank So., Hisr. 

Walton, DeAnna Fr., Med Tech. 

Wardleigh, Jim Fr , Journ. 

Warren, Gary Fr , Landscaping 



Watson, Justin Jr., English 
Webb, Colin Sr , SSVC & Hisr 
Webster, Kim Sr., Geology 
Wegmann, Mary Jr , Dus Manag. 



Weisban, Barry Sr , Journ 
Weiss, Lawrence Jr., Diology 
Welge, Steve Sr., Min. Engin 
West, Andrea Fr , Elem Ed 







HT~^k 




HT/<» 








K 


' 


"^ 


few* ' 




i 






y 


* 






\ 






250 




Whalen, Maizie Jr , Pre Med 
Wheat, Julie Sr , Journalism 
Wheeless, Timothy So., Busm 
Whitby, Cynthia So , G E 



White, Dale So., Mng. So 
Whitten, Nancy Sr., Mng Sci 
Whittig, Candace Sr., H Ec 
Whitworth, Ralph Sr , Poly Sc 



Wiard, Ted Fr , Psychology 
Wiese, Mary So., Hisrory 
Wilcks, Paige Fr., Phys Ed 
Williams, Deverlee Fr , Undec 



Williams, Chtis Fr , Diology 
Williams, Cindy Sr.. Bus. Man 
Williams, Michael Fr , E E 
Williams, Nancy So , Phys Ed 



251 



... I kind of like this dorm (White 
Pine) but it's not one of my favorite 
spots. 

You're on a floor and there's social 
interaction. But, then again, these 
walls are thin and you can hear 
things right across the hall when it's 
really noisy. Cold floors, heats always 
the same - too hot, too cold - It's 
cheap though. 

Everybody complains about the dining 
commons. I think the food's better 
than a lot of the other schools I've 
been at. It's been bad, but I eat it. I 
don't cook for myself. " 

CHRISTOPHER COLEY 



I 



252 





Willie, Anne Sr , S5VC 
Willie, Dewey Fr , Undecl. 
Willison, Kristen So , Pre-Med 
Wilson, Angela Fr., Ch. Engin, 



Wilson, Don Fr., Ch. Engin. 
Wilson, Debbie So., Bus Adm 
Wilson, Eloine Sr., Journ. 
Wilson, Mono Sr , Fr 6 Span. 



Wilson, Oren So., Biology 
Wilson, Rena Fr., Pre-Med 
Wilson, Scott Jr., Journ. 
Wines, Robert Sr., Poly Sci. 



Wise, Todd Fr., RNP, 
Word, Mark Sr., English 
Yoch, Christopher Fr., PreVer 
Yomoshito, Keith So , Bus Adm. 



253 




it > ,>•* 

. * 



«» 



I 



I love UNR. I'm from Lake Tohoe so it's 
kind of a change of environment. It's close 
to home. 

I like the campus. It's not too bad. I 
thought it was going to be worse than it 
is. It's a good school. 

I like the school. I don't have a yardstick 
of how it's supposed to be in 
college. So far, I think classes are pretty 
good. The classes are really big so you 
can't expect a teacher to be personable. 

There's definitely a social life. There's 
always something to do. I live in Nye Hall. 
Everyone's really friendly. I'm really lucky 
I live on a friendly floor and everyone's 
really nice. You can always go down the 
hall and ask if you need something. " 



KRISTIE RICHARDSON 



254 





Yenter, Mark Sr , Civ Engirt 
Yorgey, Lori Fr , Bern Ed 
Yorgey. Lynda Fr , Pre-Ous 
York, Denise Sr , Morn 



Young, Betsy Jr , Elem Ed 
Zomboni, Christopher So , Journ 
Zedaker, Timothy Jr , Zoology 
Zimmerman, Roberto Fr , Physics 



255 



ii 



Contrary to popular belief, the UNR Boxing Team, as a whole, is not a bunch of 
punch-drunk Sylvester Stalones majoring in basket weaving. The Boxing Team has the 
highest combined GPA and more of its members graduate than in any other sport. 
Coach Olivas's number one concern is school. It's always school first, and then boxing. 
Along with representing ourselves with academic and athletic accomplishments, we've 
also represented the school and the community as a national team for the past five years. 

One might think, with the merits like ours and an athletic budget like UNR's, we'd be 
treated like kings. We're not, nor do we expect to be. I just feel that a superior program 
like ours deserves better than substandard equipment. The boxing ring we have is 
substandard; it's dangerous. We used to have an adequate ring, but it was sold. Coach 
Olivas didn't even know until after it was gone. The one we have now is poorly padded 
and lies directly on the floor. A ring is usually raised above the floor, so the platform will 
absorb the shock if someone is knocked down. Without the platform, the person absorbs 
the shock. 

The gloves we use at practice are so worn out that the straw stuffing leaks out on the 
inside of the glove. Believe me, when your hands are pounding directly against straw, 

seven days a week, you're ready to 
go see Madge and the Palmolive 
commerical. Infections from blisters are 
not uncommon. 

Coach says that if a person really 
wants to box, these things shouldn't 
matter. I guess he's right. Besides, 
there's not much he can do about it. 
In order to get money up here, you 
have to be a politician. Jimmy's just a 
coach, he doesn't have time for those 
things. 

We're not just the Boxing Team. 
We're THE #1 BOXING TEAM IN THE 
COUNTRY. I don't want to sound like a 
crybaby. I just think we deserve 
something better than we have now. 
A little respect would be nice too. 

I'm not putting the blame on (Dick) 
Trachock, Bob Cashell, or anyone in 
particular, because I know how many 
channels, a decision like this would 
have to go through. People want 
winners, and in football and 
basketball, money means winning 
and winning means money. Besides, 
anyone who bench presses 500 
pounds can have whatever he wants 
in my book. 

DAVE MORGAN 




ii 



256 



Alpha Epsilon Delta 



Alpha Epsilon Delta is the International 
Premedical Honorary Society for students who 
plan to go into the medical field. 



Bottom left to right: Charles Rose, Dione Sekiguchi, Colleen C. Lyons, Melanie 
Hendricks, Liana Lianov, Marisa MacNelly, Second row: Jeff Chiara, John Warren, 
Dee Dee Stern, Georgianna Duxbury, Dirk Fletcher, Tom deTar Third row: Kafy 
Pastrell, Paul McClintock, Dill Holland, Ernie Sullivent, Chorlas Potter, Dob Nelson 
Fourth row: Dennis Wilson, Ingrid Lubbers, Don Tibbitts, Bruce Meneley, Gary 
Swain 



2SH 




Bottom left to right: Kurt Hordung, Liso Richordson, Paul Sormon. Chris Newell, 
Susan Moreda Second row: William O'Donnell, Jane Mills, Denise York, Laura 
Griffin, Darrell Wharf, Dave Gillett Third row: Michele Ryman, Judy Sharpe 



/' 



\ 



Aggie Club 



Aggie Club, the Agricultural Service 
Organization, is a service organization 
associated with the College of Agriculture. 
Members meet professionals in the field of 
agriculture and participate in such events as 
Mackay Week, collegiate livestock judging, 
the Nevada State Fair and Nevada Junior 
Livestock Show. 




259 




Forensic Society 



Bottom left to right: Dob McDrite, Don Hondley Second Row: Herous Yeghiyoee, 
Peggy Berney, Neil Friedman Third row: George Lowson (Coach). Jim Pace, Dawn 
Cica, Chris Hamilton Fourth row: Dennis Mills, Robert Zill, John Darriage 



The Forensic Society is an intercollegiate 
speech and debate club that represents the 
university. 



260 




Bottom left to right: Demise York, Chorlotte Clifford, Michele Rymon, Thereso Smoll 
Second row: Micholos Hogg, Ronald Shone (advisor), Chris Newell. Mike Evans, 
Susan Moreda, Wayne Johnson 



Alpha Zeta 



Alpha Zeta is the Honorary Agricultural 
Fraternity for students in the College of 
Agriculture who meet certain eligibility rules. 
Only a certain portion of each class is 
accepted. The group sponsors the Agriculture 
Spring Awards Banquet. 



261 



ASCE 



The American Society of Civil Engineers 
consists of students in the Civil Engineering 
Department. ASCE participates in Engineers 
Day each year, and they design, build and 
race a concrete canoe in conjunction with the 
Mid-Pacific Student Chapter meetings. 
Students also meet and practice with 
engineers from the community. 



Doitom left to right: Kwok Ho, Suson Gaskiu Second row: Stan Aiafu, Roberto Lewis, 
Tim Clifford Third row: Lorry Mines, Eric Pastorino Fourth row: Shrooms Dodd, Aric 
Boston 




262 



Baptist Student Union 



The Baptist Student Union is mode up of 
Baptist students who attend the university. 



Bottom left to right: Don Book, De-Rosa Simmons. Denise York. A. Rudy Dwett 
Second Row: Coe Pennington, Mary Joe Wegmann, Frindia Simpson, Ginger Mulky 
Third row: Debbie Parks, Peter Jackson, Tim Zedaker. Cynthia Williamson, Nancy 
Dettori, Mike Dettori 




263 




ASUN 



Bottom left to right: Suzy Hollerboch, Maizie Wholen, Marilyn Courson (Adm. Sec), 
Solly Beesley (Adm. Sec), Suzy Gray (Adm. Sec.) Second row: Lorrie Shenk, Joe 
Kirchner, Stephanie Brown (Pres.), Barry Weisbond, Cari Carlson, Richard Sheehy, 
Stephanie Krmpotic Third row: Greg Crossman, Bill Bokelmann (V.P. Activities), 
Anne Willie, Scott Wilson, Aric Boston Fourth row: Doc Bodensteiner (Sen. Pres.), 
Gary Fuller (V.P. Finances), Ralph Witworth, John Galvin, Terry Flannigan, Vic 
Vicari, Lisa Leachman, Harold Hildebran 



The Associated Students of the University of 
evada consists of the undergraduate student 
ody, who are unified into a self-governing 
ody. A president, two vice presidents and 
D senators, who are chosen from their 
respective colleges, represent university 
students in such areas as budgeting, activities 
;; and university programs. 



264 




:^:mMM&m, 



Executive Board 




Bottom: Stephonie Drown (President), Top row: Doc Dodensteiner (Senote 
President), Dill Dokelmonn (Vice President of Activities), Gory Fuller (Vice 
President of Finonce ond Publications) 



265 



Activities Board 



Bottom left to right: Doc Bodensteiner, Suzy Hollerboch, Stephanie Krmpotic, Vic 
Vicori, Lisa Leochmon Top row: Anne Willie, Maizie Wholen. Bill Bokelmann 



266 




Finance Control Board 



ard appropriates 
student activities 
izations for their 



Bottom left to tight: John Galvin, Gteg Ctossmon Second row: Cori Carlson, Ralph 
Whitworth Third row: Harold Hilderbtan. Joe Kircher, Gary Fullet 




267 



Blue Key 



Blue Key is a men's honorary service 
fraternity at the university. The organization 
sponsors dances, along with other activities. 



Bottom left to right: John Carter, Chris Barrett, Kevin Hampson, Tim Krump Second row: 
Butch Anderson (Pres.), Ernie Sullivent, Doc Bodensteiner, Bob Mays Third row: Matt 
Carter, Ken Delia, Bob Klosterman, Bob Wines, John Gartman Fourth row: Harold 
Hidlerbran, Rich Poore, Grant Coonley, David Landelt, Gary Fuller 



268 




Chinese Student Assoc. 



The Chinese Student Association consists of 
Chinese students attending the university, 
who gather together and participate in 
various activities. 



Bottom left to tight: Daisy You. Winnie Hsieh, Bing-Tai Hsieh, Shetee Pan, Wen-Yak 
Chen Row two: David Yau. Sue-Jean Lin. Kuo-Ten Chang. Ben Huo Row thtee: Ing 
Chen, Tien-Lin Wei. Tuw Cheng 




269 




*m 







-* 








Delta Sigma Pi 



Delta Sigma Pi is the professional business 
administration fraternity. They conduct 
activities on campus, have speakers and are 
involved in activites within the business 
college. 



Bottom left to right: Michael Maiciol, Kriti Hill, Justine Fulton, Mike Pacini, Kathryn Duffy, Madeline Sanford, Chris Volk, Tracy Mathia, Chris Barrett, Larry Fry 
Second row: Paul Anderson, Pat Tabor, Nancy Luther, Brenda Cristani, Linda Wolf, Robert Mann, Harold Hilderbran, Gigi Hay, Tom Dradley, John Gartman Third 
row: Cobi Bernard, Joe Peltier, Bobbie Wiley, Kim Pacini, Mathew Pichon, Cherrill Christian, Mark Krmpotic 



270 




French Club 



The French Club is made up of university 
students who shore on interest in the French 
language and customs. 



Bottom left to right: Jim Williams. Francisco Aponte, Russ Blackburn, Michael Dahl Second row: Judy Doyle, Pat McQuillan, Robin Marquis, Justin Watson, 
Michelle Stevenson Third row: Robert Artinian, Kathy Mason, Steve Bremer, George Gadou, Paul Beasley Third row: Susan Doeden, Mono Wilson, Susan Piatt, 
Ann Kersten, Jamshid Azatm 



271 



IEEE 



The Institute of Electrical and Electronic 
Engineers consists of students enrolled in at 
least six credits in electrical engineering or 
related branches. Members are eligible for 
tutoring in mathematics, physics and 
engineering, can participate in the IEEE- 
sponosred Paper Contest and interact with 
classmate and teachers outside of the 
classroom. 



Bottom left to right: Andy Siu, Marcello Manca, Lee Perno Second row: Rahn C. 
Merrill, Kirk Schoen, Darren McDride, Khosha Ostovony, Mr. Banks, Rami Sho- 
kouel, Rod Hines Third row: Hans von Gortle, Bryan Sheldon, Rodger Lakey, 
Jack Cross, Tim Miller Fourth row: Jim Michaelis, Jim Considine 



272 




Inter-Fraternity Council 



The Inter-Fraternity Council is made up of 
members from each fraternity who make the 
guidelines for fraternity activities and 
coordinate functions for the Greeks. 



Bottom left to right: Mike Storr. Ryan Tors. Chris Schroeder. Ken Fritz, Ross 
Rytting, John Peck (Pres.) Top row: Dove Longfield. Orion Rothe. Ed Doherty. 
Jock McGinley. Russ Blackburn, Justin Watson, David Hansen (Asst. Dean of 
Students) 




273 




IVCF 



The Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship is 
open to all university students, regardless of 
their religious background. Activities include: 
training in the areas ofdiscipleship, 
evangelism and missions; bible studies, 
weekend conferences and large-group 
weekly meetings with singing, praying 
praising and sermons. 



Bottom left to right: Holly Miller, Dob Carlson, Garland Shinn, Doug Hoppe, Sue 
Moreda Row two: Dob Willyord, Dove Houp, Sharon Schulz, Heidi Walker, Lynette 
Houpt, Susan Glancy Row three: Don Winne, Jim Michaelis, Marianna Replogle, 
Dob Laughter (Adv.), Dave Pugh, Dave Rupert, Lori Pugh, Steve Knapp. Steve 
Flook Row four: Mary Gilmore, Teresa Hinen, Kelly Dullis, Roger Jenks. Dana 
Pinard, Pam Gould, Dill Gardner, Marianne Mollart, Tom Derry Row five: Coroll 
Massie, Robin Joyce, Debbie Combs, Dave Thornton, Nancy Herrman, Jeff Park- 
hurst (pres.), Jenny Faust, Ron Hothhorn 



274 




Bottom left to right: Laura Daskerville. Jim Jackson, Stephanie Krmpotic, Linda 
Harasymchuk, Ellen Dowers Top left to right: Richard Skow, Adrian Havas, Ralph 
Whitworth (Pres.). Laurel Jackson, Steve Dobrescu, Kevin Reeves, Cherril Christian, 
Dave Krump, Melanie Polk, David Heischmann 



Low Club 



The Law Club includes students who ore 
interested in going into the low field as a 
profession. 



275 



Mockoy Misses 



Mackay Misses is a service organization 
that acts as a hostess group for the president, 
administration and faculty of the university. 
They also participate in the pre-game 
football brunches, graduation ceremonies and 
similar functions. 



Bottom left to right: Jane Fundis, Cathy Heydon, Susie Gray (Pres.), Tomi Romelli, 
Theresa Ponton, Kitty Menraberry, Cecelia St. John (Advisor), Row two: Lori Foote, 
Bobbie Wiley, Kim Sroll, Andrea Podell, Lynn Semenza, Carrie Orcut, Jamie 
Newphor, Margie Hassett, Debbie Prina 



276 




MSCME 



The Mackay Society of Chemical and 
Metallurgical Engineers is a professional and 
social organization that allows members to 
interact on a social and professional basis. 
Lectures, field trips and a chance to become 
affiliated with the American Institute of 
Chemical Engineers are some of the 
opportunities the organization offers. 



Bottom left to right: Joh Sheridan, Norm Goddor, Denise Goddard. Rich Dush, 
Second row: John Langhans, Lori Smith, Shori Lewis, Raul Ayala, Third row: Robin 
Krai 




277 




NSMT 



Bottom left to right: Chris Collier. Sue Mortinmoos, Lesley Grundy. Row two: Carl 
Deem, Alicjo Powliszyn, Jaime Miller. Kothy Johnson Row three: Sherry Vonce. 
Wendy Kiehn (Adv.), Rhonda Nuttall, Morie Tortelli (Pres.). Amy Parks Row four: 
Elijah Mutua. Susan Uhalde, Melinda Cooper, Amy Parks, Mike Rangel, Ken 
Machara (Adv.), Tom McMeekin, Annette Young, Karen Grenier, Carol Gericke 



The Nevada Society for Medical 
Technologists is made up of university students 
planning to work in the medical technology 
field. 



278 



1 




E 



Bottom left to right: Jone Fundis, Jennifer Duxbury, Meg Petermon Row two: Trocy 
Molder (Pres.), Lori Foote, Chris Collier, Christi Ferroro Row three: Laura Hewitt, Lisa 
Foster, Diane Sekiguchi, Tammy Tomaso 



Panhellenic Council 



The Panhellenic Council is composed of 
members from each sorority who coordinate 
Greek activities. 



279 



'The Peavine Mountain Gong" 



Over a decade ago, this university was the home of a few bold 
individuals who proudly proclaimed themselves as "The Peavine 
Mountain Gang." This group of rebels was formed to insure that the 
rights and privileges of all GDI's would not become dwarfed by the 
shadows of the mythical Greek gods who claimed rule over these 
hallowed grounds. The men who comprised this gang believed in the 
true pioneering spirit; searching for the simple pleasure to be found in a 
bottle of smooth J.D., and a good woman on a cold night at the top of 
the mountain. 

These men are the next generation, drawn together to once again 
uphold the spirit of the West. They have become "The Peavine 
Mountain Gang-Revisited." They're hard; they're tough; they'll stay in 
the saddle all night. 

The "Gang" rides again! 



Bottom left to right: Freddy "White Shoes" 
Steinly, "Little Dove Wilkinson, Eric "Dig E" 
Postorino. Joe "Torzon" McDoniels, Steve 
"Dilton" Lambert, Greg "Pretty-Boy" Modonno, 
Joe "Screech" Roto Top row: Mikey "Tyrone" 
Sauers, Lorry "Drugs" Dodd, Forrest "Wilderness 
Walker 



280 






Artemisia 



Overcoming obstacles at every turn, the Arte- 
misia staff worked long, hard hours to bring you this 
edition. We've made friends. We've made enemies. 
But like the saying goes, "We don't care. We don't 
have to. We're the Artemisia staff." 



From left to right: Susan Anderson (mng. editor). 
Bill Webb (editor), Sherri Fries (copy editor), 
John Newman (chief photographer), Mike Han- 
zek (photographer), and Bill Dornisch (writer). 



281 





Roily Squod 



Bottom: Lourie Hoyden Row two: Gretchen Dahlberg, Carol Mathews (Co-captain), 
Cathy Laporte Row three: Laura Hewitt, Do Howard, Jeff Mikkelsen, Kandee 
Chaney Row four: Jim Smith, Stacy Case (Co-Captain) Top: Virginia Kirby 



The Rally Squad is the university's 
cheerleading squad. They cheer at all 
university football and basketball games. 



,'H/ 




Bottom left to right: Mike Dettori. Linda Smith, Fay Emmerich, Phil Grey Row two: 
Joanne Mulholland, Carren Clifford, Diane Sjoberg, Genivieve Hannon (Pres.) Row 
three: Dr. Paul Tueller, Dill O'Donnell, Dave McMindes, Greg Deasley, Dr. Wayne 
Durkhardt (Adv.) 



Range Club 



The Range Management Club's activities 
include: participation in the Society for Range 
Management, annual firewood sales, plant 
identification contests and a goat roast. 



283 



Sagens 



Bottom left to tight: Mono Wilson, Helen Byrnes, Chris Toeubel, Lori Foote, Andreo 
Podell, Dee Dee Stern, Tomi Newpher Row two: Kothy Porter, Anne Willie, Loni 
Phelps, Laurie Chapman, Tami Romelli, Jill Holderman, Margie Hasseft, Kim Berk- 
shire, Candice Jackson, Katy Pastrell, Cathy Marchall, Karen Deal, Diane Sekiguchi, 
Cecelia St. John (Adv.) Claudia Sands, Peggy Berney, Melissa Sharp 



Sagens is an honorary service organization 
for junior and senior women. The 
organization provides services to the 
community, such as: carving pumpkins for the 
children's wards of two hospitals at 
Halloween; providing Thanksgiving dinner for 
local needy families, sponsoring a foster child, 
and working at fall and spring registration. 




i 



284 




Search And Rescue 



The Search and Rescue team aids in local 
searches for missing airplanes and people, all 
year round. 



Bottom left to right: Evert Droderick, Morsho Petry. Stephoni Miller. Deth Morrow 
Row two: Heidi Olson, Terry Wilcox, Drod Martin 




. 






i * I ■ . Jin 




. 



285 



Alpha Psi Omega 



Alpha Psi Omega, the honorary drama and 
theatre fraternity, encourages and 
perpetuates quality drama at the university. 



Dottom left to right: Virginia Vogel, Dob Dillord (Coach), Blaze Freedman, 
Second Row: Linda Lehman, Tom McQueen, Pannonica Drown, Violet Horvath 
Darbara Goff Third Row: Jerry Darnall, James Cashell, Mike Fernbach Forth 
Row: Susan Stowell, Kevin Craik, Greg Artman, Jim Anderson 



28f, 





SOS 



The Student Orientation Staff consists of 
volunteers who assist with the planning, 
development and implementation of the 
New Student Orientation Programs at the 
university. They provide student-to-student 
contact for new students and provide student 
input in assessing the university's orientation 
programs throughout the year. 



Bottom left to right: JoAnn Pratt, Anne Whitemoine, Sandy Madura, Linda Harasymchuk, Sherri Fries, Suzie Pittenger, Cae Pennington, Paula McCaffery. 
Jon Greer, Theresa Hinen, Diane Vogt, Richard Moore Top row: Kevin Kreisler, David Hansen (Asst. Dean of Students), Jami Holmes, Brian McCormack, 
Kevin Reeves, Steve McCormack, Kevin Reeves, Steve Bus, Kathy Welch, Mariso MacNelly, John Gartman, Maizie Wholen, Corinne Stott, Susan 
Anderson, Kevin Oxburrow, Paige Lubra, Cobi Bernard 



287 



Spurs 



Spurs is o nationally recognized service 
organization for sophomore men and 
women. It serves the campus and community 
through service-related projects. Activities 
include: service projects at convalescent 
homes and the VA hospital, ushering at 
concerts, working football concession stands, 
conducting tours of the university and 
working registration. 



Bottom left to tight: Peggy Detney, Christi Fettato, Chris Ipsen, Lautie Hall, Diane 
Davis, Jano Dunn, Kathy Derry, Dee Dee Stern Row two: Tom Hill, Dennis Mills, 
Robera Lewis, Dale White, Cathy Clements, Paul Whitehouse, Greta Hasle, Cobi 
Bernard Row three: Cecelia St. John (Adv.), Katie Eymann, Clary Simmonds, 
Mancy Herrmann, Wendi Hunter Leslie Burrows, Angela Trueba, Kerti McCulloch, 
Suzie Pittenget, Karyn Leavitt, Paige Lubra 




288 



55CSS 



The Social Services and Corrections Student 
Society is made up of students majoring in 
social services and corrections, who are 
planning to go into that field after they 
graduate. 



Bottom left to right: Theresa Ponton, Tricia Westergord Row two: Lisa Tolomo, 
Cothy Uccelli. Jeon Schoefer, Helen McMullen, Becky Pronge Row three: Sharon 
Schulz. Carol Galantuomini. Trisha Oyagliana, Chris Winslow, Colin Webb, Paul 
Frediani 




289 



§ 




UNR Concert Choir 



Bottom left to right: Tina Cordisco, Becky Rogers, Pom Flander, Gwyl Wilson, Lee 
Birdsey, Ellen Schriber, Coroll Mossie, Heidi Martin, Maribeth Moytan, Liz Elwood, 
Chris Turner, Marie Raetz, Audreci Goreu, Row two: Carol Carrier, Ginger Mulky, 
Robbie Bradley, Sheryl Sandoval, Beatrice Michel, Greta Hasle, Lisa Lennier, Mary 
Replogle, Peggy Little, Patty Gomez, Deb Combs, Joyce Risi, Liz Baker Row three: 
Trace Robbers, Victor Campanoro, Randy Rossow, Phil Geffe, Michael Hansen, 
Walt Brown, Jose Lopez, Todd Silva, Tony Flannigan, Earth Callisy, Paul Aberastuci 
Row Four: Robert Fry, Ralph Denny, John Moatgomery, Dan Smith, Steve Knapp, 
Don Green, Dan Palmer, John Boril, John Swallow 



The UNR Concert Choir performs at many 
university functions, including inaugurations 
and graduation ceremonies. 



290 




Bottom left to right: Tori Thomoson. Dick Nixon, Robin Soma, Gory Fuller, Debbie 
Loop, Clark Peterson. Row two: Dill Jorgenson, Sherri Fries, Dale White (Pres:), Gail 
Hellwinkel, Mark Weisberger, Mary Monahan, Row three: Sheri Drantingham, 
Clary Simmonds, Dave Neidert. Billy Carter Row four: Tim Morrill, Don Handley, 
Robert Farnsworth, Roberta Lewis, John Damage, Bill Hamma, Eric Foster 



Young Republicans 



The Young Republicans of UNR exist for 
the furthering of the Republican ideal at the 
grass roots level. 



291 



Women Engineers 



The Women Engineers exist to help 
women in the areas surrounding engineering. 



Bottom left to right: Lee Perdo, Robin Krai, Lisa Glook, Carol Roth Dock row: Lori 
Smith, Sue Goskill, Denise Goddord, Elsi Reinhord 




292 



Medical School Class Of '64 



The Medical School's graduating class of 
1984. 



Bottom left to right: Neil Shonnord, Rich Yamamoto, Ken Pittmon, Jerry Moccioli 
Row two: Terry Buccombuso, Jerry May, Kevin Jensen, Cathy McGow, Julie 
Follette, Rondy Leefelt, John Page Row three: Koren Cross, Lois Johnson, 
Barbara Molina, Darcy Gogert Row four: Bill Rilotta, Ronette Cajko, Sandy 
Scheler-Mongiaysla, Diane Thinne, Bill Thoodword, Robynne McWayne-Kelch, 
Ron Jenks, Brian Trimble, Stacie Prato, Bill Zamboni, Greg Dean, Kerry Francis 
Row five: Rod Craft, Alan Steinberg, Marlene Schwartzer, Turkey Antolik, Sue Pierce, John Bruwers, Don Crum, Mike Scraff, Jim Christiansen, Brad Graves, Jerry 
Nishiguchi, Sara Googe, Mitch Tarbet, Chris Scully Row six: Doug Hanks, Tim Kelly, Russell Neibaur, John Guisto, Rick Cross, Gary Star 




293 



Medical School Class of 63 



The Medical School's graduating class of 
1983. 



Bottom: Ty Etickson Row two left to right: Mark Stephens, Chris Pederson, Jeannie McConce, Kim Adomson, Lorry Kloich, Mark Delzo, Tom Cosrello Row 
three: Dono Meyer, Cecelia Honn, Cindi Drown, Gory Sharp, Steve Derman, Dob Hansen, Patty Rosehauer, Row four: Richard Wagner, Sue Theems, Jeff 
Thong, Sheldon Kop, Tony DiAngelis, Vince Dolton, Stuart Steele, Fred Redfern, Frank Cornett, Tom Ambrose, Rick Hellfrich, Joe Salamore, Dante Vacca, 
Craig Cox, Mike Dauman, Dave Lehnherr 



9 
4 



- 



294 






Sagebrush 



The award-winning Sagebrush, ASUN's official bi- 
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exclusive coverage of events and controversies at 
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"The University of Nevada looks upon her Alumni with affection and 
with pride, and sees in the growing list of their names her most 
cherished honor roll." 

Samuel D. Doten 
1924 



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Credits 



Sherri Fries: 

3l7d 

Randy Gragg: 
46ab 

Mike Hanzek: 

83obc, 84. 126abc. 138abc. 139abc. 144abc. 241, 245. 249 

Nancy Herman: 

205. 212. 219. 230. 236. 252. 254 

Harold Hilderbran: 

2f. 63, 79. 80, 310c, 315. 316a. 318a 

Richard Hill: 
22o 

Suzanne Hollerbach: 

10c, 3a b, 53e. 55a 

Tracy McKuen: 
64a bed. 65a be 

John Newman: 

5o, 6b. 7b, 12, 14a, 15. 16ab. 17ad. 18a. 19ab, 22b, 23a, 24ab, 25, 29, 30o, 3lcd, 33be. 34, 36, 37, 38bc, 39de, 40, 42b, 44, 51, 53ad, 59a, 60b. 
72c, 77. 78a. 85a. 88a. 89abc. 91a. 92a. 93. 95, 97abc, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 120, 121, 122, 124, 127, 128. 129, 131a, 132, 133, 134, 135, 140, 
141bc, 281, 295abcde, 296, 3l0d, 314a. 3l6ef, 317b. 319bcd, 320c 

Office of Communications and Broadcasting: 

82. 94. 103. 104 

Dill Webb: 

1, 2abcde, 4. 5b, 6a, 7a, 8, 9abcd. lOabd. 11ab, 13, 14bcd, 16cd, 17bc. 19c, 20, 21, 23b, 24bc, 26, 27. 28, 30bc, 3lab, 32abc, 33adfg, 35abcd. 38a, 
39acd, 41, 42a. 43ab, 45abcde. 46cd, 47ab. 48, 49, 50abcd. 52abc, 53bc, 54, 55bc, 56, 57, 58ab, 59b, 60acd. 61. 62. 66. 67. 68ab, 69ab. 70abcd. 
71. 72ab. 73abc, 74abc. 75abc. 76abc, 78b, 86, 87a, 98, 99, 100, 101abc, 105, 106, 107, 111, 118, 119obc, 130abc, 131ac, 136, 137, 141a, 142abc, 
143. 202. 207. 235. 256, 309abc, 310ab, 311abc, 312, 313abc. 3l4bcd, 316bcd, 3l7ac, 319a, 320ab 

Randy Webb: 

108, 109, 110 



Specifications 



Artemisia 1981 is the yearbook of the University of Nevada-Reno, printed in 1981 by Josten's American Yearbook Company in 
Visalia, California. 

The basic paper stock is 80 lb. Warren gloss enamel, except pages 1 through 86 and pages 304 through 320, which are 100 lb. 
Warren gloss enamel. The endsheets are stainless steel selected from company stock. 

Division page typeface is 36 and 60 point Manhattan. Headlines are 36 point serif gothic bold italic- while body copy is 10 and 
12 point serif gothic bold. 

The cover material is white linen bookcloth lithographed with process black. Cover photography and design by Dill Webb. 

Additional specifications upon request. Copyright ® 1981 by William Edward Webb. All rights reserved by the editor. Library of 
Congress catalog number CA26-275. 



303 






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305 



The best years of your life. 

How many more times will my criticisms of American education be met by this predictable retort, "but these are the best 
years of your life." 

The first time I heard this gem was during the summer before my freshman year in college. I was working in the tobacco 
fields on a farm near Greenville in eastern North Carolina. Most of my comrades never finished high school. Some of them 
dropped out of school before the ninth grade. There were a few who had no formal education whatsoever. 

As the summer progressed, I realized that what these people lacked in degrees they made up in wisdom - something they 
called common horse sense. 

One day Old Ike, Herschel, Roy and I sat under an oak tree eating lunch. We were talking and laughing, and they were 
kidding me about how nice it was to see a white boy out in the fields and how someday we would all be able to work 
together up in the "big house" as owners. Old Ike got kind of quiet in the middle of our clowning; he was lost in thought. Roy 
and I talked about our plans for the upcoming school year. Roy was the first person in his family to attend college and he was 
really excited. He had a scholarship at the University of North Carolina to study accounting. 

The ten-minute whistle blew, and we drained the last of our Cokes and began the long walk back to the field we were 
working. 

Old Ike began to speak. " ... better git yurself an educashin, boys," he said. "Go to that there collige and make sumthang 
out of yerselfs. Don't let the guvment put a wedge between ya'll. Learn to live together or we gonna all surely be back in 
slavery and chains together. Dem communists don't care wether you be black or white or yeller or pink with green polka dots. 
Ya'll jes' remember that ya'll are both Americans." 

In de best times of ya'lls' lives. 

I've heard this many times since and although Old Ike's words still burn within me I've started to question the part about the 
best of times. The potential for "de best times" is there but somehow never realized. Somehow I find it hard to believe that the 
"best years of my life" are spent reading Advanced Linear Equations or memorizing important dates in Nevada history. 

You know what I think is blinding us to what Ike and the others said? 

Boredom. 

I have come to the conclusion that boredom is robbing us of the last chance to truly have fun and to forget the seriousness 
that forces most students to scowl and stoop under the heavy cross we bear upon our shoulders. 

D-O-R-E-D-O-M. A lack of something interesting, exciting, new. 

Boredom? 



"You unappreciative child! How can you be bored? You go to the University. You work two jobs. You have a new car, can 
ski three times a week, have plenty of camera equipment, and edit a college publication and you tell me that you are bored. 

How can you be bored?" 

It's quite simple, actually. 

Have you gone to a professor lately and tried to get him to allow you to write a paper on an aspect of the course that truly 
interests you, instead of taking a test that requires nothing more than data regurgitation? You know as well as I do that the test 
he gives will require a lot of cramming and will be flushed from your cerebral cortex five minutes after you leave the exam 
room. Do you think that this matters? 



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'I'm sorry but ..." 

"I'm sorry, but I don't hove the time 
to grade extra papers. I'm sorry, but it 
wouldn't be fair to the other students. 
I'm sorry, but you must take the test. I'm 
sorry, but the department and universi- 
ty regulations prohibit" . . . and so on. 

"But you don't understand - this is 
suppose to be the best time of my life." 

Through episodes like this I get the 
feeling that we're missing something. 
We pay hard-earned money to attend 

is university. I think the least we could 
be offered are some choices. Aren't we 
here to expand our minds, seek the 
truth, search for answers, become edu- 
cated people? Isn't one of the purposes 
of education to*help one learn to adapt 
to the constant changes within our 
world? Can't I design a personalized 
educational plan? 

"But a degree in medieval mysticism 

an't pay ..." 

AAGGhh. There is that word again, 
ray . . . pay, payoff, income, salary. 
The paycheck is the end of employ- 
ment. Employment is the end of educa- 




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"What did you say?" 
"Did you say employment is the end 
of education? That's blasphemous. If 
mployment is the end of American 
iucation then why have universities? 
hy not have highly specialized techni- 
cal schools run by American industry?" 
I "You tell me." 
"Well, ahhh, I don't know, but I think 
at's an extremely cynical view. If get- 
ting a job is the desired end of a college 
education then I guess you will be tell- 
ing me next that boredom is the means 
by which education brings you that 






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311 




Almost. 

Actually, conformity is what is being 
taught today in the universities. If you 
want your job then prove that you will 
not be the thorn in your employer's ear- 
lobe. Don't question the system. Don't 
try to be difficult. Take the test. Sit 
through that course in Nevada history. 
Take those extra statistics and technical 
courses that they fell you that you 
should take. 

Be practical. Be realistic. 
"Play the game! Stifle your creativity. 
Take courses which prepare you for gainful employment. After all, this is America. Sport stars make more than the President. 
Some corporate executives make more than a university's payroll for an entire year. Some rock stars make more than the GNP 
of some African nations. You don't want to grow old and have cash flow problems, do you?" 
"No, but I don't want to play the game either. 

I want to learn things. I want to be creative. I want to become educated. I want to explore, to seek answers to the problems 
which plague our society. Man doesn't live by bread alone - remember?" 
"Economics is the opiate of the people." Hemingway 
"Employment is the end of education." Webb 
"Get yerself an educashin." Old Ike 

Now we arrive at the paradox. Man might not live by bread alone, but he certainly does not live too long without bread or 
some type of food. Bread, like everything else, has its price. 

Economics is transformed from the opiate of the people to the heart which pumps the blood which feeds the society. 
Economics has arrived from being the dismal science to the raison d' etre of living in a highly specialized society, such as ours. 
If you want to eat, get a job. If you want to eat well, get an education. But become educated according to the dictates of 
the system. Play by the rules. Most importantly, don't upset the status quo. 
"But why not?" 

"Because we are all in the system together. Although even a fool can see that there are a lot of problems and faults in our 
system, it is the only one that we have that works reasonably well." 

You can tell the emperor that he has no clothes on, just don't be foolish enough to try to make him put clothes on until he is 

ready. 

Because if you upset the system, you threaten the very existence of all the people within the system. The best insurance 
that a society has is making an individual conform to its precepts. 

Once an individual's lot is tied to that of society, it becomes increasingly more difficult to manifest ones own individuality. 
The rewards for supressing the urge to lash out against the system, whether this is manifested by blowing up Exxon's corporate 
headquarters, or by more subtley just dropping out and doing whatever one chooses, are quite adequate. 



312 



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Playing the gome pays! 

Anger: I hate what I see around 
me! I hate the game! 

Denial: I will not be a part of it! 

Bargaining: Maybe I'll play 
enough to get a job and live well, 
but I'll keep my beliefs. 

Acceptance: Oh well, I have to eat 
... I do enjoy my new car, my ste- 
reo, diving at Monterey, and skiing 
at the Lake. 

Conformity: Playing the game 
does pay. 

But that hurts. 

Of course, it does. But who said 
that the best years of your life would 
only be filled with pleasure? Who 




promised that you wouldn't be bored with the game? 

What! The best time of my life? You've spent all this time questioning, complaining, and criticizing and now you are going to 
tell me that this is the best time of my life? 

Yes. Think about if. Why do you think people look back on their college days with such fondness? Its not because they 
enjoyed Roman philosophy, fluid mechanics, price theory, or physical chemistry. It isn't for the days that they had three exams 
and two papers due. It isn't for the pressure of trying to obtain an education while working. It isn't for all the time spent 
memorizing the lineage of King Mugga-Mugga of Ethiopia or the molecular structure of certain chemical reactions. If certainly 
isn't the fact that they could write papers instead of taking meaningless tests either. They waded through a more structured 
curriculum than you or I. And they were probably just as bored at times. There is something about college days that cause 
everyone who has already gone through them to look back wistfully and proclaim: "Yes, those were the days." After 
repeating this they invoke the blessing of God over your head and urge you to make the most of your time in college. Then 
with the certainty of the sun setting in the West: Get an Education! 

These are the best years of your life! 

What is it that makes college graduates and Old Ike throw these phrases around? Where is the link? What do a barely 
literate migrant worker and my dermatologist perceive about our college years? 

Freedom. 

Freedom? 

Think about it. 

When you leave UNR you can't tell your employer that you won't be in because you and friends sat up until 3:00 a.m. 
drinking beer at the Sahara discussing the coming of the Anti-Christ or sexual positions of theKarma Sutra. You can't leave your 
patients for three days just because a blizzard left two feet of powder up at Heavenly. You can't fell a client that you won't 
make the 3:00 appointment because you'd rather play frisbee in Manzanita Bowl and work on your spring fan. 

And so on. 

Freedom. 



316 




What about boredom? 

Glad you asked. Boredom is a pe- 
culiar situation. It either dulls your 
sensibilities, wears you down, brings 
you to submission, i.e. stagnation, 

or. 

Boredom gives you time for seek- 
ing, creating, or solving any circum- 
stances to which you wish to direct 
your energy. You are free to tackle 
any problem, taste, feel, touch, hear, 
smell or see anything that you wish, 
to explore, create, question, support, 
defend, attack, destroy, harbor, nour- 
ish, to do anything or to do nothing. 

And the beautiful part of it all is 
that professors, parents, and the 
world around you are quicker to tol- 
erate and sooner to forgive you be- 
cause you are in a time of your life 
when your position excuses your 
flights of fancy. Even in your most 
miserable failures you strike a famil- 
iar note with all those who have 
gone before you. 

You are a S-T-U-D-E-N-T 

In the best time of your life. 

The other day some friends and I 
were walking through Meadow- 
wood Mall and saw a poster which 
captured the ultimate rationalization 
for our behavior during our time at 
UNR. On a black background in vivid 
yellow letters were the words: 

It seemed like a good idea at the 
time. 



317 



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